University of Illinois

 

Full Catalog

100 Level | 200 Level | 300 Level | 400 Level | 500 Level

100-Level Courses

LIS199 Undergraduate Open Seminar [First-Year Discovery Program]
Credit 1 to 5 hours. May be repeated
Description Topics vary. See individual sections. Established in 1994, the Discovery Program helps Illinois students enhance their education through greater interaction with faculty in small classes. The interactive courses also enable faculty to share their research in a particular area with students. It is intended for first-year students only. Discovery sections cover a wide range of disciplines and enrollment is limited to a maximum of twenty students per section. Some Discovery courses can be used to satisfy General Education requirements or requirements in a major, while others are electives.
Prerequisites Freshman Standing
LIS199OBI On Being Included [On-Being Included: Where are you in history? Who's missing?]
Credit 3 hours
Description Get acquainted with your new roles as a student, with the University of Illinois, its archives and other students here, past and present. Activities and readings are designed to help you think about your own identities and how you, your relatives, and/or your communities might be represented, or not, in historical documents. You'll have a chance to focus on a particular object, item or file that interests you and create a project around it. Think of it as "animating the archive," or having a "conversation" with some part of the past. [Section approved 1/22/13. First offered Fall 2013 but was canceled due to low enrollment.]
Prerequisites First Year Freshman

200-Level Courses

LIS202 Social Aspects Info Tech
Credit 3 UG hours
Description [Same as INFO 202 (controlling dept) and MACS 202] Explores the way in which information technologies have and are transforming society and how these affect a range of social, political and economic issues from the individual to societal levels. [This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a UIUC Social Sciences course.] [Title change effective Spring 2011; formerly known as "Social Aspects Info Sys"]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior.

300-Level Courses

LIS310 Computing in the Humanities
Credit 3 UG hours
Description [Same as INFO 310] Explores use and application of computers to scholarly activity in the humanities, including computer-based cooperation agreements and their impact on humanities scholarship, and computers and writing, and related topics.
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior
LIS351 Design Info Interfaces [The Design of Usable Information Interfaces]
Credit 3 UG hours
Description Examines issues of human-computer interaction and the design of better computer interfaces. Students review interfaces to a number of different information systems to gain an understanding of the challenges and trade-offs in good design. The course involves practical interdisciplinary team work in designing, testing, and improving interfaces.
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior
LIS390 Special Topics Info Studies [Special Topics in Information Studies]
Credit 1 to 3 UG hours. May be repeated in same or separate semesters as topics vary to a maximum of 12 hours.
Description Directed and supervised investigation of selected topics in information studies that may include, among others, computers and culture; information policy; community information systems; production, retrieval and evaluation of scientific or social science knowledge; computer-mediated communication; and computer-supported cooperative work. See individual sections for descriptions of each topic.
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.
LIS390CC Computers and Culture
Credit 3 UG hours
Description Explores cultural ideas about computers, including hopes and fears about the effects of computers on our lives. Will analyze images of computers in fiction and movies. The course will also examine hackers, online subcultures, and other computer-related subcultures, and the integration of computers into various cultural practices. [First offered Fall 2006]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.
LIS390CWC China and World Communications
Credit 3 UG hours
Description This course explores the ongoing restructuring of Chinese and world communications, and the interlocks between the two. We will analyze three unfolding histories: the development of digital technologies, new network systems and new media; changing institutional policies for communications and information; and evolving relations between China and the global political economy. Power dynamics and social and political conflicts will be assessed. A research paper (topic to be approved by instructor) is required. [First offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites Junior or senior
LIS390EC Digital Media Ethics
Credit 3 UG hours
Description Examines a variety of ethical issues raised by uses of digital media. Students will consider ethics in such areas as social media, cell phone use, computer games, intellectual property, privacy, data mining, online pornography, etc. The course provides an introduction to theories of ethics and includes attention to different cultural perspectives on digital media and digital media ethics [First offered Fall 2005; former title Ethics in Cyberspace. Title and description updated Spring 2014]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.
LIS390HFI Hist Found of Info Society [The Historical Foundations of Information Society]
Credit 3 UG hours
Description Today's information society bespeaks a long history, exhibiting marked continuities with the past as well as some sharply defined new features. Yet the historical foundations of the information society remain poorly understood. This course develops such a framework, by examining emergent information institutions and practices from early modern Europe to the later 20th century. It examines the historical development of the information society through a number of important conceptual lenses, including: modernity and post-modernity; Fordist and post-Fordist capitalism; social class and information poverty; social and technological determinism; utopianism and dystopianism; and empire and globalization. This course currently counts as an elective in the informatics minor and will count as a required core course for the informatics major once that degree program is approved. [First offered Fall 2009]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.
LIS390PVT Privacy and Technology
Credit 3 UG hours
Description This course prepares students to recognize, analyze, and manage privacy challenges created by technology from a sociotechnical perspective. We will review prominent theories of privacy, contemporary privacy policy, privacy law, and privacy as a social, legal, and economical value. The course will identify both privacy defeating and privacy enhancing technologies, and consider how legal regimes and policy choices as well as technological design can mitigate or heighten the risk of unwanted information disclosure.We will consider privacy implications of automated electrical and transportation systems, medical records, online behavior, biometrics, big data, cloud computing, workplace monitoring, law enforcement and national security access, and etc. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. [First offered Spring 2014]
Prerequisites
LIS390RGI Race, Gender and Info Tech [Race, Gender and Information Technology]
Credit 3 UG hours
Description This course critically examines the ways in which information technologies are both the source and consequence of race and gender relations. Will explore theories of race, gender and technology and apply these to case studies of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Particular attention will be given to globalization, privacy and surveillance, labor, and "digital enclosures". [First offered Spring 2006; description revised 11/8/10]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.
LIS390THP Telecomm: History & Policy [Telecommunications: Introduction to History and Policy]
Credit 3 UG hours
Description Telecommunications provides the foundation for many types of information exchange. In this course, we explore how this critical infrastructure has evolved. Cultural uses, technological innovations, industry structures, and law and public policies are examined, and set within the larger movement of American history. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed. [First offered Spring 2010]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing
LIS390W1A Web Technologies Techniques [Web Technologies and Techniques]
Credit 3 UG hours
Description This course provides an introduction to the technologies behind the Web. Topics covered include: hypertext, hypermedia, the history of the Web, the role of Web standards and their impact on the development of Web resources. The course introduces principles of Web design and usability. Students will gain an understanding how the Web works and how to design, construct, evaluate, and maintain Web-based materials. [First offered Fall 2001]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.
LIS390WP Programming Web Mashups
Credit 3 UG hours
Description This course provides an introduction to web programming and web application development. In addition to developing their own web applications, students will integrate existing web applications into their own through open protocols and APIs. Topic covered include: fundamental programming concepts, database modeling, web service infrastructures and protocols, server-side programming languages and tools. Students will gain an understanding of issues involved in designing and developing interactive, dynamic web sites and familiarity with existing tools and resources on the web. [First offered Fall 2006]
Prerequisites Sophomore, junior or senior standing.

400-Level Courses

LIS403 Lit and Resources Children [Literature and Resources for Children]
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Evaluation, selection and use of books and other resources for children (ages 0-14) in public libraries and school media centers; explores standard selection criteria for print and nonprint materials in all formats and develops the ability to evaluate and promote materials according to their various uses (personal and curricular) and according to children's various needs (intellectual, emotional, social and physical).
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS404 Lit and Resources Young Adults [Literature and Resources for Young Adults]
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Evaluation, selection and use of books and other resources for young adults (ages 12-18) in public libraries and school media centers; explores standard selection criteria for print and nonprint materials in all formats and develops the ability to evaluate and promote materials according to their various uses (personal and curricular) and according to young adults' various needs (intellectual, emotional, social and physical).
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students
LIS409 Storytelling
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Fundamental principles of the art of storytelling including techniques of adaptation and presentation; content and sources of materials; methods of learning; practice in storytelling; planning the story hour for school and public libraries and other public information settings; and audio, video, and digital media. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. [Description revision effective Oct. 24. 2012]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS418 Community Engagement
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Community engagement refers to the multiple ways that information professionals in libraries and other settings learn about, collaborate with, and provide service and outreach to community members. This course provides an introduction to, and overview of, community engagement theory and practice. A significant portion of coursework will take the form of service learning or community-based research via approved projects that match students' interests. [A highly recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [Formerly LIS 490CE; permanent number approved 10/15/09 -- first used Spring 2011]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS445 Info Books & Resources Youth [Information Books and Resources for Youth]
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Evaluation, selection and use of information books and other resources for young people (ages 0-18) in public libraries and school media centers; explores standard selection criteria for factual print and nonprint materials in all formats and develops the ability to evaluate and promote nonfiction books and resources according to their various uses (personal and curricular) and according to young people's various needs (intellectual, emotional, social and physical). [Formerly LIS 590NF; 445 permanent number approved 6/7/12; the 590NF rubric was used through Summer 2012 and then discontinued]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS446 Fantasy Lit/Media for Youth
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course covers the selection and evaluation of historical and contemporary fantasy literature and media for library collections aimed at children and young adults. Texts examined will include books, movies, and games. [Formerly 590VV; permanent number approved 3/13/12]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS451 Intro to Network Systems [Introduction to Network Information Systems]
Credit 4 or 6 UG or GR hours (4 hours for lecture only; 6 hours for lecture/lab [service project]--6 hours not available for LEEP
Description Hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course steps students through choosing, installing, and managing computer hardware and operating systems, as well as networking hardware and software. The course also explores alternatives for administering IT and how to assess emerging technologies and their applicability to library settings. While students are expected to have basic computer competencies per the GSLIS admissions requirements, the goal of the course is to provide practical detailed knowledge of the technology for all levels of competency. The primary objective is to provide a conceptual understanding of the topics of the day through concrete hands-on examples of implementation. By learning the underlying concepts, students will be better prepared to help design networked systems that not only work well today, but also develop systems that can be easily adapted for the needs and technologies of tomorrow. Field trip fee required for 6 credit hour lecture/lab (service project) option. [Revised description and credit options effective Fall 2012]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS452 Foundations Info Proc in LIS [Foundations of Information Processing in Lib & Info Science]
Credit 4 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Covers the common data and document processing constructs and programming concepts used in library and information science. The history, strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are evaluated in the context of our discipline. These constructs and techniques form the basis of applications in areas such as bibliographic records management, full text management and multimedia. No prior programming background is assumed.
Skill basic Unix
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS453 Systems Analysis and Mgt [Systems Analysis and Management]
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Covers how to evaluate, select and manage the information systems that will be used in the daily operation of libraries and information centers. Includes the systems used by technical staff and the information consumers. Course will focus on information as a product. Attention is given to the operation of an organization as a whole and the impact of change on the integration of resources, work flow and usability. Formal methods for modeling systems, and industry practice techniques of analysis are used to address these problems and opportunities. [A required core course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration.]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS456 Info Storage and Retrieval [Information Storage and Retrieval]
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Introduces problems of document representation, information need specification, and query processing. Describes the theories, models, and current research aimed at solving those problems. Primary focus is on bibliographic text and multimedia records.
Skill basic Unix; basic HTML
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS458 Instruction and Assistance Sys [Instruction and Assistance Systems]
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Provides an introduction to instruction and assistance methods used in a variety of information systems including libraries, archives, museums, and electronic environments. Includes an overview of theoretical and applied research and discusses relevant issues and concepts. Students will have an opportunity to design and present an instruction or assistance program.
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS482 Writing Technologies [Same as ENGL 482. English is controlling dept.]
Credit 3 UG hours [Section 1U]; 4 GR hours [Section 1G]
Description Examines the relationship of computer technology to the larger field of writing studies. Topics include a historical overview of computers and other writing technologies; current instructional practices and their relation to various writing theories; research on word processing, computer-mediated communication, and hypermedia; and the computer as a research tool.
Skill Students must have a basic knowledge of word processing.
Prerequisites Junior, senior or graduate student
LIS483 Ugrad Bioinformatics Seminar
Credit 0 to 2 UG hours. May be repeated in separate terms to maximum of 2 UG hours. No graduate credit.
Description [Same as CPSC 491 and INFO 491. INFO is controlling dept.] Introduces the field of bioinformatics and computational biology. [Approved for both letter and S/U grading.] [Approved 10/7/10 -- first offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites Consent of instructor
LIS490 Advanced Topics Info Studies [Advanced Special Topics in Information Studies]
Credit 2 to 4 UG or GR hours -- see each topic section for credit information. May be repeated as topics vary.
Description Directed and supervised investigation of selected topics in information studies that may include among others the social, political, and historical contexts of information creation and dissemination; computers and culture; information policy; community information systems; production, retrieval and evaluation of knowledge; computer-mediated communication. See individual sections for descriptions of each topic.
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and LIS 201 or LIS 202 or consent of instructor; graduate student.
LIS490BA Book Arts Seminar
Credit 2 UG or GR hours
Description Advanced study of the history, literature, aesthetics, and criticism of the Book Arts. This course will offer advanced study of the role of artists' book in contemporary art. It will offer students a new perspective on this diverse medium, incorporating the history of book production and its impact on societies and the cultural dissemination of information. Through readings and field trips, students will develop a critical awareness of the book as an art form. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2010]
Prerequisites Junior, senior or graduate student.
LIS490DB Introduction to Databases
Credit 4 UG and GR hours
Description The course provides students with both theoretical and practical training in good database design. By the end of the course students will create a conceptual data model using entity-relationship diagrams, understand the importance of referential integrity and how to enforce data integrity constraints when creating a database. Students will be proficient in writing basic queries in the structured query language (SQL) and have a general understanding of relational database theory including normalization. [First offered Fall 2009]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS490DD The Digital Divide [The Digital Divide: Policy, Research, and Community Empowerment]
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours; 2 hrs only UG & GR Fall 2013
Description This course combines an intensive reading of texts with hands on field work in building bridges across the digital divide. Students will work in teams by partnering with an assigned community organization to develop and implement a plan to informaticize that organization. Part of this course will involve a lecture series by leading information technology professionals regarding community uses of information technology and related issues involving the digital divide. [A recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [First offered Fall 2008]
Prerequisites Junior, senior or graduate student.
LIS490EG E-Government
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description This course examines the strategies, practices and technologies of electronic government. Governments worldwide are integrating computer-based technologies into the centerfold of public administrative reforms to digitize the delivery of services and the process of governing. E-government relies on IT to automate and transform the processes to serve citizens, businesses, governments, and other constituents. The course focuses on understanding models of delivering services through IT-enabled processes, open government, security issues, techonologies, and economic evaluation Lessons learned in the course can be applied to public organizations, non-profit organizations, and civil society. [First offered Spring 2010]
Prerequisites Senior standing and LIS 201, LIS 202 or equivalent; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS490GI Geographic Information Systems
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Focuses on analytical methods using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and will apply these methods to community-based issues, local and national government, and civil society, as well as participatory methods using GIS. A hands-on course with weekly labs and service learning projects. [First offered Fall 2008]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS490IT Entrepreneurial IT Design
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Introduces students to a range of rapid prototyping techniques and methods to analyze needs, opportunities and design spaces. Students will work in teams to develop ideas for novel computational devices or applications to meet identified needs. Covers the interlinked entrepreneurial skills of identifying an unmet need, exploiting technological opportunities, exploring a design space to refine an idea, and communicating a design vision through demonstrations with prototypes and proofs of concept. This enables developers to show how their envisaged working interactive technology will be used productively in a particular real-life context. Communicating the vision of computational devices is a challenge because dynamic use in context is hard for people other than the device's developers to imagine. The ability to produce convincing, clear, powerful demonstrations even at the early stages of a project is a highly valuable entrepreneurial skill, and also highly applicable within an organization. [First offered Spring 2007]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS490JG Design Universally Acc Web 2.0 [Designing Universally Accessible Web 2.0 Applications]
Credit 3 or 4 hours
Description This is a project driven course to develop the next generation of open source toolbars to help web application developers understand the accessibility features (or lack of) of their web applications to people with disabilities. Students will learn about web accessibility, universal design and functional accessibility features needed by people with disabilities to access web applications. Students will learn to use HTML, CSS, javascript, ARIA <http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria/> and the Open Ajax Accessibility <http://www.oaa-accessibility.org/> Rule set to build accessible web widgets and develop toolbars for popular browsers and web application frameworks. [SP11;lead dept CS] [replaced 490AR]
Skill Web design skills and experience (i.e., created and maintained web pages)
Prerequisites Junior, senior or graduate student.
LIS490MU Museum Informatics
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Covers information organization and access in museums, exploring the relationship between information technology and modern museum environments. Students learn about classification systems for museums, computer systems for information storage and retrieval, universal access to shared electronic data, copyright in the digital world, virtual museums, interactive exhibits, and information management in museums, through lectures, computer-based activities, and interactive discussions. The final project involves design of an electronic portfolio of virtual museum resources. Students are encouraged to approach class topics from their individual backgrounds in the humanities, sciences, or social sciences. There will be additional assignments required of graduate students. [Elective for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered as 350MUI in Fall 2001]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students for on-campus sections. Non-LEEP students may enroll on a space-available basis in the online section.
LIS490PV Privacy in the Internet Age
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description This course will examine the notion of privacy in its historical context, and in relation to existing and projected information/communication technologies and institutional arrangements. Topics covered include the nature of "identity"; protecting personal data; technologies for personal identification, societal surveillance, and privacy enhancement; technologies for describing, monitoring, and controlling levels of privacy; changes in cultural, legal, and policy understandings of privacy and privacy rights; needs for and approaches to privacy protection in a variety of institutions and industries; security-privacy interactions and policy implications; and specific cases such as privacy implications of automated transportation systems, medical records, online behavior, Google Maps, information mining, trans-border data flow, credit card theft, etc. [First offered Fall 2013]
Prerequisites Junior,senior, graduate student
LIS490SM Social Media & Global Change
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course covers the impact of global and national computer networks on politics, culture, and social relations overseas during a time of upheaval and revolutionary change. Guest lectures will be given by informatics practitioners and scholars with expertise on specific world regions. Topics may include the new social media, the politics and culture of the internet, hacktivism, cyber warfare, and mobile telephony and their role in the formation, dissemination, manipulation, and suppression of public opinion in Russia/Eurasia, the China/Pacific region, Central/South America, as well as Africa, Iran, and the Middle East. [First offered in Spring 2013]
Prerequisites Junior, senior, graduate student
LIS490ST Community Informatics Studio
Credit 4 UG or GR hours
Description Studio-based learning methods, which are common in art and architectural education, are used to help students address a real-world problem or 'case'. Working in teams and mentored by the instructor and experts, students will learn how to 'be a professional' in an environment in which process is as important as project. During the term, students will participate in a cyclical process of design creation, presentation and critique culminating in a final presentation during the final day(s) of class of the finished proposal/design of how to address the case. [First offered Summer 2010]
Prerequisites Junior, senior or graduate student.
LIS490TE Intro to Technology in LIS [Introduction to Technology in LIS]
Credit 3 UG hours; 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of technology in LIS. Following an overview of information system concepts, terminology and usage in organizations, there will be discussions covering a wide variety of topics including hardware and software, systems development (traditional and modern methods), programming languages, databases and the internet. Special attention will be paid to the knowledge and skills needed to succeed at GSLIS (servers, file access and management, office software, markup languages, website design and development, etc.) and LIS professional settings. Application of concepts is key. Readings will be supplemented with hands-on exercises and collaborative projects. [First offered Fall 2010]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.
LIS490WP Creating Web Mashups
Credit 3 UG hours; 4 GR hours
Description Provides an introduction to programming and web development through the creation of web mashups. Students will integrate existing open source and proprietary tools, platforms and resources to make and remake a variety of interactive and dynamic web applications and interfaces. Topics covered include: implementing graphic design through code, the application programming concepts in active website components, working with databases, web service infrastructures and protocols, use of API's and third-party extensions and both server and client side programming languages. Students will have an opportunity to gain familiarity with the back-end of content management systems and to use common resource kits. Assignments will consist primarily of large on-going projects. Undergraduates will be able to choose to complete a selection of these assignments while graduate students will be required to do all of them. In true mashup style the class will exemplify learning through reverse engineering, collaboration and experimentation. [First offered Spring 2013]
Prerequisites Should have either (1) substantial experience with HTML and CSS or (2) basic experience with a formal programming language like Python, Java or C++. Courses that qualify include LIS590LW, LIS452, LIS490DB, LIS390W1A, CS125, CS101 and INFO103. If you are unsure contact the instructor.
LIS490YS Youth Svcs Community Engage [Youth Services Community Engagement]
Credit 2 UG or GR hours
Description This service-learning course will examine youth services by exploring how young people's information and educational needs are met by community institutions and organizations. We will draw upon youth services librarianship and youth informatics concepts to explore youth informatics in after school programs, community center programs, and other institutions that serve young people. A significant portion of coursework will will take the form of service learning or community-based research via approved projects that match students' interests. [Recommended for both Youth Services and Community Informatics students.] [First offered Fall 2011]
Prerequisites Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor for undergraduates; consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students.

500-Level Courses

LIS501 Info Org and Access [Information Organization and Access]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Emphasizes information organization and access in settings and systems of different kinds. Traces the information transfer process from the generation of knowledge through its storage and use in both print and non-print formats. Consideration will be given to the creation of information systems: the principles and practice of selection and preservation, methods of organizing information for retrieval and display, the operation of organizations that provide information services, and the information service needs of various user communities. Required M.S. degree core course.
Prerequisites LIS Master's student
LIS502 Libraries Info and Society [Libraries, Information and Society]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Explores major issues in the library and information science professions as they involve their communities of users and sponsors. Analyzes specific situations that reflect the professional agenda of these fields, including intellectual freedom, community service, professional ethics, social responsibilities, intellectual property, literacy, historical and international models, the socio-cultural role of libraries and information agencies and professionalism in general, focusing in particular on the interrelationships among these issues. Required M.S. degree core course.
Prerequisites LIS Master's student
LIS503 Use and Users of Info [Use and Users of Information]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Explores information needs and uses at a general level, addressing formal and informal information channels, barriers to information, issues of value, and impacts of technology. Examines information seeking practices of particular communities and within various environments, introducing recent approaches to user-centered system design and digital library development. Provides an overview of methods that can be used to study information needs, information seeking behavior and related phenomena.
Prerequisites LIS 501
LIS504 Reference and Info Services [Reference and Information Services]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Explores reference and information services in a variety of settings, introduces widely used print and online sources, and develops question negotiation skills and search strategies.
Prerequisites
LIS505 Adm Mgt of Libs Info Centers [Administration & Management of Libraries and Information Centers]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Designed to explore the principles that govern how organizations and institutions work, this course provides a foundation for and introduction to the theories, practices and procedures involved in the management and administration of libraries and information centers.
Prerequisites
LIS506 Youth Services Librarianship
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Theory and techniques in planning, implementing and evaluating library programs/services for youth (age 0-18) in public and school libraries/media centers; the knowledge base, skills, and competencies needed by the library media professional in the development of all aspects of young people's reading/viewing/listening and information literacy skills.
Prerequisites
LIS507 Intr to Bibliographic Metadata [Introduction to Bibliographic Metadata]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Introduction to basic principles and concepts of descriptive and subject cataloging in the context of information service needs for various user communities. Explores principles, structures, standards, technologies and practices relating to organizing and creating access to print and non-print media. Includes coverage of subject analysis and descriptive practices. Introduces controlled vocabularies. [Formerly Cataloging and Classif I. New title and description approved 6/29/12; effective Fall 2012.]
Prerequisites LIS 501, or concurrent enrollment in LIS 501 and LIS 507.
LIS508 Collection Development
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Examines issues affecting the development and management of collections for academic, public, special and school libraries: collection development policies, collection assessment, the marketplace, publishing, legal issues, and budget allocation; document delivery; collaboration and cooperation. [Formerly 590CD; permanent number approved 3/2/2012; first used Fall 2012]
Prerequisites LIS 501, or concurrent enrollment in LIS 501 and LIS 508
LIS510 Adult Public Services
Credit 4 GR hours
Description The literature, history, and problems of providing library service to the general adult user; investigation of user characteristics and needs, and the effectiveness of various types of adult services.
Prerequisites
LIS511 Bibliography
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Covers enumerative bibliography, the practices of compiling lists; analytical bibliography, the design, production, and handling of books as physical objects; and historical bibliography, the history of books and other library materials, from the invention of printing to the present. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
LIS512 History of Libraries
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description [Same as MDIA 512. LIS is controlling dept.] The origins, development, and evolution of libraries and related institutions, from antiquity to the twentieth century, as a reflection of literacy, recognition of archival responsibility, humanistic achievement, scientific information needs, and service to society. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
LIS514 History of Children's Lit [History of Children's Literature]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Interpretation of children's literature from the earliest times, including the impact of changing social and cultural patterns on books for children; attention to early printers and publishers of children's books and to magazines for children. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS515 Media Literacy for Youth
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Provides students with theoretical knowledge and practical methods useful to librarians and other professionals working with young people and media. Building on traditional understandings of literacy, media literacy explores the consumption and production of diverse types of texts including print, images, games, and music. Topics for this course may include the role of race in media, media literacy as a catalyst for social change, and intellectual property issues related to media education. [Formerly 590ML; permanent number approved 4/13/2012; first used Spring 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS516 School Library Media Center
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description School Library Information Specialists serve children and young adults (ages 5-18) in K-12 school library media centers. Students will acquire specific knowledge, skills and competencies needed to design, develop, integrate and assess curriculum and instruction with an emphasis on the information needs of K-12 students. Readings and projects will provide students with opportunities to apply the practical knowledge and skills they have learned about building reading literacy, teaching information literacy skills, collaborating with teachers and integrating resources into teaching and learning. [Formerly LIS 590SM; permanent number approved 3/2/12; first used Summer 2012]
Prerequisites LIS 506
LIS518 Community Informatics
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Survey of an emerging field that studies how local, historical communities use information and communication technologies or otherwise access, create, organize, and share information. Covers key principles for working in libraries or the wider non-profit/public sectors as individuals, organizations, and communities harness new technologies and media. Prepared both professionals and researchers, whatever their technology background. Especially useful for those interested in public or community libraries, youth services, university public engagement, social work, education, and anyone interested in working with or studying underserved communities. [A required course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [Formerly 590CO; permanent number approved 9/10/09; first used Fall 2010]
Prerequisites
LIS519 Soc Sc Research in LIS [Social Science Research in LIS]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Introduces students to the fundamentals of doing social science research in LIS. Students will learn how to frame a research problem, choose an appropriate research method, apply it, and write up the research for presentation and publication. This course is directed toward Master's and CAS degree students in library and information science and is recommended for any students expecting to do research as part of their future work. [A highly recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [Formerly 590RE; permanent number approved 9/10/09; first used Fall 2010]
Prerequisites LIS Master's or CAS Student
LIS522 Info Sources and Svcs Sciences [Information Sources and Services in the Sciences]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Overview of the information needs and practices of researchers, practitioners, and the general public. Detailed consideration of disciplinary literatures and print and electronic reference materials. Advanced training in addressing reference questions and research problems in the sciences.
Prerequisites LIS 504
LIS523 Info Sources and Svcs Soc Sci [Information Sources and Services in the Social Sciences]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Overview of the information needs and practices of researchers, practitioners, and the general public. Detailed consideration of disciplinary literatures and print and electronic reference materials. Advanced training in addressing reference questions and research problems in the social sciences.
Prerequisites LIS 504
LIS524 Info Sources and Svcs Arts Hum [Information Sources and Services in the Arts and Humanities]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Overview of the information needs and practices of researchers, practitioners, and the general public. Detailed consideration of disciplinary literatures and print and electronic reference materials. Advanced training in addressing reference questions and research problems in the arts and humanities.
Prerequisites LIS 504
LIS525 Government Information
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Aims to acquaint students with government publications, their variety, interest, value, acquisition, and bibliographic control, and to develop proficiency in their reference and research use; considers publications of all types and all governments (local, national, international) with special emphasis on U.S. state, and federal governments and on the United Nations and its related specialized agencies.
Prerequisites LIS 504, or consent of instructor
LIS526 Searching Online Info Systems [Searching Online Information Systems]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Explores the world of online information retrieval (IR) systems, with particular emphasis on conceptual understanding of basic system structures and searching strategies needed to become an effective online searcher. Students will explore three key commercial online systems (Dialog, LexisNexis, Factiva), developing professional level searching skills transferrable to other IR systems. Other topics discussed include database selection and evaluation, end-user interface issues, and the role of information professionals in the online world.
Prerequisites LIS 504, or consent of instructor.
LIS527 Literacy, Reading, and Readers
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Reading and literacy play a central role in all areas of LIS, as well as in its cognate fields, yet they are a largely invisible part of our professional infrastructure. This course addresses this oversight through a multidisciplinary investigation of the various activities, processes, and means of acquisition associated with literacy and reading as physical, social, educational and cultural activities. Drawing upon scholarship in LIS, education, literature, history, sociology, psychology, and anthropology, and with special consideration given to the dimensions of age, gender, class, religion, and culture, we will expand upon traditional notions of literacy and explore the range of scholarly approaches to the study of literacy, reading, and readers. [Formerly LIS 590LR; permanent number approved 3/13/2012]
Prerequisites
LIS528 Adult Popular Literature
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description A survey of genre fiction, readers' advisory services, the promotion of fiction, narrative nonfiction & media collections in libraries, the social effects of reading, and publishing as a business. Course objectives include: understanding why adults read for pleasure; gaining familiarity with popular fiction genres and their authors; understanding principles and tools of readers' advisory services; examining the issues of popular fiction publishing including the impact of technology in creating new formats; and the process of acquisition, maintenance, and marketing of popular fiction in libraries. [Formerly 590KK; permanent number approved 3/2/2012; first used Summer 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS530 Info Needs of Part[icular] Communities [see individual sections for topics]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Special topics sections for in-depth study of the characteristics and information needs of specialist users of libraries; goals and objectives, policies, and services; reference and bibliographical aids; and effective services that satisfy these special needs. See individual topics section for description.
Prerequisites LIS 504, or consent of instructor. Individual topics sections may have additional prerequisite.
LIS530A Music Libnship & Bibliography [Music Librarianship & Bibliography]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Explores music librarianship and music bibliography. Identifies the different types of music library and the professional organizations that represent them; examines why music materials often demand special treatment in a library, for example in acquisition, cataloging and classification, circulation and conservation; introduces basic music reference tools; surveys the history of music printing and bibliography; examines copyright legislation as it affects the music library; identifies different types of music library patron, and assesses those patrons' varied demands on the music library; introduces the professional literature of music librarianship, and assesses what skills and training are needed by current and future music library professionals; examines the role of digitization and other technologies in the future dissemination of music materials. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS530B Health Sci Info Svcs & Res [Health Sciences Information Services and Resources]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Provides a general introduction to information services and sources which serve the health-related information needs of health care professionals and the lay public. Provides exposure to the tools and services most often encountered in delivery of health-related information, issues and trends in health science library practice, ethical issues in provision of health-related information, and specialized programs and services for all health information consumers.
Prerequisites
LIS530C REEES Bibliog Research Methods [Russian, East European & Eurasian Bibliography & Research]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course is designed to provide graduate students in both area and information studies with a comprehensive introduction to research techniques in the Russian & East European field. Depending on enrollment, course content is designed to cover a broad range of interests--for example, Central Asia as well as Russia--while demonstrating that many tools serve more than one specialty. The course will also discuss the resources and skills required for digital scholarship, as well as traditional approaches. It will draw on specialists for various sessions, and will include readings, assignments and a final paper. [Formerly titled 'Slavic Bibliography']
Prerequisites
LIS530E Business Information
Credit 4 GR hours
Description A study of the literature, information sources and reference aids in the area of business. Introduces the student to the U.S. business information environment. Examines the impact of the national economy and international trade on U.S. industries and companies and the nature of various business functions within a company in an attempt to understand what business information is needed and how it may be used by individuals within an organization. Provides a general mapping of the variety of external information sources.
Prerequisites
LIS530G Law (Legal Resources)
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Introduces legal sources used in a variety of library settings, covering both U.S. and state legal resources. Discusses standard print legal sources such as reporters, digests, statutes, legal encyclopedias, and looseleaf services. Explores the use of legal online services such as LEXIS and WESTLAW through extensive hands-on assignments. Analyzes reference and collection development issues related to legal sources.
Prerequisites LIS student.
LIS530I Bio Informatics Probs & Res [Biological Informatics Problems and Resources]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Explores the current landscape of biological informatics from the LIS perspective, including: types of problems studied by biological scientists, methods and instruments used, and which problems have informatics components; the range of data that exist; the uses of metadata, ontologies, and controlled vocabularies; data manipulation tools; application software; specific tasks and workflows; and data-driven science. Open to students with interests in academic science librarianship or data curation. Lecture, discussion, and hands-on components. [Formerly 590BI; first offered as 530, section I, in Fall 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS530M Bibliography of Africa
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Covers the available universe of African studies materials in all formats and how to find them. The class begins with evaluating general reference sources and continues with sources by discipline for the study of the continent of Africa. Covers research strategies for the humanities and social sciences. Students will complete a major annotated bibliography on a topic of their choice.
Prerequisites LIS 504 prerequisite is waived for this section.
LIS544 Library Cooperation & Networks
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Development of library systems, with special reference to public libraries as a norm for the development of library services; detailed treatment of library standards, the growth and development of county and regional libraries, and the role of the state library and of federal legislation.
Prerequisites LIS 505, or consent of instructor.
LIS548 Library Buildings
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Studies the library's physical plant in the light of changing concepts and patterns of library service; analyzes present-day library buildings (both new and remodeled) and their comparison with each other as well as with buildings of the past; examines the interrelationship of staff, collections, users, and physical plant; discussion supplemented by visits to new libraries and conference with their staffs. A two-day field trip is required. An additional non-waivable fee is assessed to the student's tuition & fees bill, plus the student will be responsible for one night's hotel stay.
Prerequisites
LIS549 Economics of Info [Economics of Information]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description The various definitions of information in economic and social terms as discussed in library and information science as well as other literatures are related to government public policies and social policies. Issues such as information as a commodity and as a public good are explored. The impact of the economics of information and related public policies on libraries and information centers is discussed from a national and international perspective.
Prerequisites
LIS556 Implement Info Stor and Retr [Implementation of Information Storage and Retrieval Systems]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Engages the design, deployment and evaluation of information retrieval systems in a variety of environments. Emphasis is twofold. First, students will study advance methods of query and document representation and related formalisms for performing retrieval. Second, students will work with a variety of data sets and several open-source information retrieval and information analysis software suites. The course is intended to extend students' understanding of state-of-the art search and retrieval methods. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration] [Description and prerequisite statement revision effective Oct. 24. 2012]
Prerequisites Prerequisites: LIS 452 (either the 2 credit hours or the 4 credit hours are acceptable) and LIS 456.
LIS560 Digital Libraries
Credit 4 GR hours
Description A comprehensive examination of the history and state-of-the-art in digital library research and practice. Focuses upon the theoretical, technological, human factors and evaluative components of digital library research and practice. Course includes an intensive reading of the literature, review of existing technologies and proof-of-concepts implementation projects. Students should have access to a personal computer on which they can experiment on their own with downloaded software tools. Students must be competent in basic computing including the installation and configuration of software packages. [Required course in CAS for Digital Libraries concentration.] [Formerly 590DI; permanent number approved 6/7/12; first used Fall 2012]
Skill Competency in basic computing including the installation and configuration of software packages.
Prerequisites 501 or consent of instructor; previous or concurrent enrollment in LIS 452 (either 2 or 4 hours acceptable) or proof of competency in programming.
LIS561 Information Modeling
Credit 4 GR hours
Description An introduction to the foundations of information modeling methods used in current digital library applications. The specific methods considered include relational database design, conceptual modeling, markup systems, and ontologies. The basic concepts underlying these methods are, respectively, relations, entities, grammars, and logic. Implementations include relational database design, FR/EER/UML diagrams, XML markup languages, and RDF/OWL semantic web languages. First order logic is emphasized throughout as the foundational framework for information modeling in general, and for contemporary web-based information management and delivery systems (including semantic web technologies) in particular. Required course in CAS in Digital Libraries concentration. [Formerly 590IM; permanent approved 5/7/12; first used Fall 2012]
Prerequisites LIS 501, or concurrent enrollment in LIS 501 and LIS 561.
LIS562 Metadata in Theory & Practice
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Combines theoretical examination of the design of metadata schema with their practical application in a variety of settings. Hands-on experience in the creation of descriptive, administrative, and structural metadata, along with their application in systems such as OAI harvesting, OpenURL resolution systems, metasearch systems and digital repositories, will help students develop a thorough understanding of current metadata standards as well as such issues as crosswalking, metadata schema, metadata's use in information retrieval and data management applications, and the role of standards bodies in metadata schema development. [Required course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration.] [Formerly 590MD; permanent number approved 6/7/12; first used Fall 2012]
Prerequisites LIS 501 or consent of instructor
LIS567A Academic Librarianship
Credit 4 GR hrs
Description Introduces the higher education environment in which academic librarians and other information professionals operate in order to prepare students for leadership roles both within academic libraries and in their parent institutions. This course explores academic librarianship through a variety of lenses including: history and organization of higher education; accreditation; characteristics of students; roles of faculty and other campus professionals; and current issues and challenges.
Prerequisites
LIS568 Theological Librarianship
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Provides an overview of the contexts, materials, services, and issues characterizing theological librarianship. Students interact with a number of librarians currently working in the field. Students enrolled for 4 hours complete an additional term project. [Formerly 590TL; permanent number approved 5/16/2013; effective beginning Spring 2014]
Prerequisites
LIS569 Financial Management
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of library financial administration, including budgeting and planning within the mission and goals of the organization. Provides an orientation to the variety of financial management techniques appropriate for libraries and information centers, with an emphasis on sources for obtaining financial support, controlling expenditures, creating and controlling budgets, financial decision making and exploring specific financial and budgetary problems for the major operational areas of libraries -- public services, technical services, information technology and facilities. [Formerly 590FM; permanent number approved 6/7/12; first used beginning Fall 2012] Offered on-campus and via LEEP in alternate years in the Fall semester.
Prerequisites
LIS577 Advnced Bibliographic Metadata [Advanced Bibliographic Metadata]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Seminar on theoretical and applied approaches to cataloging, including the creation and management of complex descriptive and subject metadata. Topics include current developments in conceptual models for bibliographic materials; information processing and mapping; socio-cultural and critical warrant; and ethical foundations of information organization. Students will engage critically with principles and practices in the application of bibliographic standards in a variety of contexts. [Formerly Cataloging and Classif II. New title and description approved 6/29/12 and effective Fall 2012.]
Prerequisites LIS 507, or consent of instructor.
LIS578 Technical Services Functions
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Seminar on the principles, problems, trends, and issues of acquiring, identifying, recording, and conserving/preserving materials in all types of libraries and information centers; includes the special problems of serials management; emphasizes service aspects.
Prerequisites LIS student.
LIS580 Rare Book and Spec Colls [Rare Book and Special Collections Librarianship]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Designed as a practical introduction to Rare Book and Special Collections Librarianship, to cover for the neophyte as well as the experienced librarian the many issues of these departments' responsibilities, including selection, acquisition, receiving, cataloging, processing, shelving, circulation, inter-library loan, reference, preservation and conservation, security, exhibition, publication, and so forth, including the uses of information technology. [Required course for the Certificate in Special Collections.] [Formerly LIS 590RB; 580 permanent number approved 6/7/12; first used Fall 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS581 Adm and Use Archival Materials [Administration and Use of Archival Materials]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Administration of archives and manuscript collections in various types of institutions. Theoretical principles and archival practices of appraisal, acquisition, accessioning, arrangement, description, preservation, and reference services. Topics will include: records management programs, collecting archives programs/special collections, legal and ethical issues, public programming and advocacy, and the impact of new information technologies for preservation and access. Lectures, discussion, internet demonstration, and field trips to the Special Collections Department and University Archives. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS582 Preserving Info Resources [Preserving Information Resources]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Covers the broad range of library preservation and conservation for book and nonbook materials relating these efforts to the total library environment; emphasizes how the preservation of collections affects collection management and development, technical services, access to materials and service to users. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS583 Grad Bioinformatics Seminar [Same as CPSC 591 and INFO 591. INFO is controlling dept.]
Credit 1 to 2 GR hours. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 4 hours.
Description [Same as CPSC 591 and INFO 591. INFO is controlling dept.] This seminar series focuses on research in the field of bioinformatics and computational biology. [Approved for both letter and S/U grading.] [Approved 10/7/10 -- first offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites Consent of instructor
LIS584 Archival Arrang & Descrip [Archival Arrangement and Description]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Provides seminar discussions and a hands-on processing experience that applies current theories and practices utilized to solve the most common problems that are encountered by today's archivists and curators when arranging and describing historical records, archives, manuscripts, and artifacts. Issues of intellectual and physical arrangement, description, and access are addressed. [Elective for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [Formerly 590AA; permanent number approved 6/7/12; first used Summer 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS585 International Librarianship
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Focuses on International Librarianship (how librarians communicate on international issues) and how that differs from comparative librarianship (the comparative study of library services in specific contexts). Examines how concepts such as "one-world" and "free flow of information" are valid in the international information arena; the importance of internationalizing library education; the role of international information agencies and the need for formulating information policies. Local and regional issues relating to library and information science are studied in the context of global issues. [Formerly 590IL; permanent number approved 3/16/12; first used Fall 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS586 Digital Preservation
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Examines current problems with and approaches to digital preservation that are fundamental to the long-term accessibility of digital materials. Also examines the range of current research problems, along with emerging methods and tools, and assess a variety of organizational scenarios to plan and implement a preservation plan. Topics will include basic information theory, preservation of complex digital objects; standards and specifications; sustainability and risk assessment; authenticity, integrity, quality control, and certification; and management of preservation activities. [Formerly 590PD; permanent number approved 9/28/10; first used Spring 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS588 Research Design in LIS
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Provides an introduction to the design of LIS research, beginning with an in-depth consideration of the philosophical and logical underpinnings of research. A brief survey of different methods used in LIS research is followed by an exploration of research design issues through comparative hands-on exercises. Throughout the course the emphasis will be on research design choices, especially the connections between research questions and research methods. Required Ph.D. course. [Formerly 590DRM; permanent number 588 approved 3/2/2012; first used Spring 2013]
Prerequisites LIS doctoral student in their second semester
LIS590 Advanced Problems in LIS [see individual sections for topic]
Credit 1 to 4 GR hours (credit hours will vary for each section)
Description Variety of newly developed and special courses on selected problems within the seven curriculum domains that reflect different aspects of library and information science, offered as sections of LIS 590: Information organization and knowledge representation; Information resources, uses and users; Information Systems; History, economics, policy; Management and evaluation; Social, community, and organizational informatics; Youth literature and services. May be repeated. See individual sections for credit hours and course descriptions for each topic section.
Prerequisites Individual sections may have a prerequisite. On-campus sections: Open to LIS students; selected sections open to graduate students campuswide. LEEP sections: LEEP student; non-LEEP graduate students may enroll on a space-available basis. WISE sections: GSLIS & WISE permission required.
LIS5901 Dialogues on Feminism & Tech [Dialogues on Feminism and Technology]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Part of a massively distributed collaborative learning experiment, this seminar investigates the intersection of gender and technoculture. Built around a shared set of recorded dialogues with preeminent thinkers and artists concerning feminisms and technologies, the course utilizes collaborative resources, texts, and even objects to examine policy, accessibility, innovation, and citizenship. Student projects may utilize Scalar (a non-linear publishing platform) or the on-campus Fab Lab to build gender-conscious technologies and networks, situating them within local, interdisciplinary, and international conversations. Through reading, discussion, writing and making, we will add to a growing and global database of materials relating feminist technologies to economies, identities, infrastructures, and movements. [Meets with GWS 590 and MDIA 590.] [First offered Fall 2013] [Slight title modification for Fall 2014]
Prerequisites Graduate student.
LIS5906 Oral History
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Introduces the theory and practice of oral history to graduate students in history, communication, library and information science and related fields through reading, discussion and practice with field work and interviewing. Over the last fifty years, oral history has moved from a controversial (and sometimes despised) technique on the margins of the discipline history, to one of the most important forms of historical knowledge production and dissemination in the academic and non-academic worlds. Yet its goals and relations to the communities it touches are often less than clear. Examines oral historical works, some canonical, some experimental, produced by historians, anthropologists, folklorists, sociologists and political activists. Up for discussion are questions of orality and literacy, privileged versus marginal histories, the problem of memory, problems of listening and learning how to ask, and debates about audience and presentation. Readings will cross continents (the Americas, Europe, Africa, South America) and historical periods from the 18th through the 21st centuries. [First offered Spring 2012] [Same as LIS 590 OHT; section ID "6" used in Fall 2014 to meet with CMN 529 section 6.]
Prerequisites
LIS590A Renaissance of the Bible
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Explores the cultural, intellectual, and political circumstances of Bible production in Early Modern Europe. Major focus is on the impact of print technology on cultural changes. Course will meet frequently in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library and students will be encouraged to use holdings of the RBML. Some specific topics will be history of Renaissance humanism, the function of biblical studies in the reform movements (including the Catholic Reformation), translations of the Bible, the politics and artistry of the English-language Bible (Tyndale through the King James Version), and the artistic presentation of the Bible (especially printed art and the Bible). Issue of the physicality of the book, the book as cultural object, book design, and intentional design for reader reception will be discussed. We will also explore challenges to the Bible's authority in the seventeenth century (in particular Spinoza). [Elective for GSLIS Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2013 with RLST 503A. RLST is lead dept.]
Prerequisites Graduate student
LIS590AC Applied Business Research [...: Competitive Intelligence & Knowledge Management]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description The role of business researchers has changed dramatically, and researchers must be capable of not only identifying and locating relevant information but also synthesizing and communicating their research in various forms of deliverables to clients. The course introduces the basics and practices of Competitive Intelligence (CI) and Knowledge Management (KM), which are widely accepted business practices and techniques. Students will learn various ways to translate their research skills and knowledge in information searching into providing solutions to complex business needs. Students will be introduced to the development and current state of CI and KM in diverse organizational settings. The course provides opportunities where students are challenged to design and present research deliverables for clients using the latest techniques of CI and KM. [First offered Spring 2009 as Advanced Business Info Svcs; new title and course description effective Summer 2010]
Prerequisites Consent of instructor for non-LIS graduate students for on-campus section. Non-LEEP students may enroll on a space-available basis in the online section.
LIS590AD Sociotechnical Data Analytics
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Socio-technical data analytics combines both the technical (mathematical modeling, databases, social networking, and text mining) and social (economic, ethical, policy, and political) aspects of data analytics. Students work through a series of case studies with real data to develop both the theoretical and hands-on experience necessary to fill leadership roles in e-science, eResearch, and big data. [Required course for the Socio-technical Data Analytics Specialization] [First offered Spring 2013]
Prerequisites LIS 590AG - Evidence-Based Discovery. Students enrolled in the Socio-technical data analytics specialization have registration priority.
LIS590AE Advanced Info Lit & Instruct [Advanced Information Literacy and Instruction]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Teaching is a skill that spans librarian responsibilities and institutions. Course will build on the pedagogical experience gained in LIS 458 by providing the structure to develop, teach and revise a lesson plan as part of the library instruction program at the University Library. Guest speakers will build upon instructional design elements and discussions will provide the opportunity to discuss instructional issues such as faculty-librarian collaborations, implementing active learning strategies, assessment, and critical reflection strategies. [First offered Spring 2013]
Prerequisites LIS 458
LIS590AF African American Bibliography
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Approaches the study of African American bibliography from several perspectives: the bibliography as a genre, bibliography as technology, the librarian as bibliographer, and the bibliography (aka finding aid) of special collections and archives. Will focus on Black intellectual history and the memory of its collective intelligence. Will require each student to develop two bibliographical studies. [Description revised for Spring 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS590AG Evidence-Based Discovery
Credit 4 GR hours
Description The evidence based discovery course introduces students to theoretical models of discovery and decision making and new informatics tools that support discovery and decision making in practice. Students will explore how massive increases in data (and the accompanying analytical methods) are both challenging and reinforcing what we mean by evidence. Students will also develop the rhetorical and statistical methods necessary to combine evidence, which are particularly important in the information intensive world in which we live. [This is the first of a two-course series and is required for the socio-technical data analytics (SODA) specialization.] [First offered Fall 2013]
Prerequisites Students enrolled in the Socio-technical data analytics specialization have registration priority.
LIS590AK Architectures of Knowledge
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Explores the relationship between built environments, systems of display, and the production & circulation of knowledge. Under investigation may be the card catalog, the cabinet of curiosity, the library, the archive, the coffeehouse, the database, as well as the book and the furniture of reading and/or writing.
Prerequisites Doctoral student (campuswide)
LIS590AP Publishing as Info Profession [Publishing as an Information Profession]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course will be organized around in-depth explorations of the traditional publishing functions ranging from acquisitions through distribution, with a special focus on how those functions have been inflected and sometimes transformed by digital technologies and networked communication. Students will emerge from the course with an understanding of publishing fundamentals, both as traditionally practiced and in the current state of digital play. The course aims to prepare students for further in-depth study or for practical work experience in the practice of publishing. The course will be ever-mindful of the ways in which traditional librarian skill sets (such as collection development, metadata preparation and management and user outreach) overlap with and/or complement the skill sets of publishing professionals. [First offered Spring 2014]
Prerequisites Graduate student campuswide.
LIS590AQ Socio-Technical Futures
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This seminar will be an examination of socio-technical studies, with a particular emphasis on two themes: 1. investigating emerging information technologies and discussing how socio-technical approaches might productively approach their study, and 2. examining socio-technical studies as a field of inquiry and asking how it might be theoretically or methodologically extended. Feminist and critical race theory, social constructionist theory and complexity theory and their relationship to socio-technical systems approaches will be examined, and students will be expected to critically examine a variety of methodological approaches and consider their applicability to socio-technical research projects. Students will be expected to actively participate in the development of course discussion topics and readings. [First offered Fall 2014]
Prerequisites LIS doctoral student; doctoral students from other disciplines may enroll with consent of instructor.
LIS590AT Issues in Scholarly Communic [Issues in Scholarly Communication]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description A basic level of scholarly communication literacy and sophistication is an increasing requirement of academic librarians, both to inform their work and to make those librarians effective partners in the scholarly enterprise. This course is designed to cultivate and develop that literacy. It will address topics such as: the established modes of scholarly communication and the emergence of alternatives influenced by the growth of social media and other forms of networked communication; the divide between formal and informal modes of scholarly communication and the current state of flux as that divide begins to collapse; the varying economies of scholarship (the reputation and prestige economy, the financial economy both in the market and in the mission-driven research academy, and the economic impact of scholarly communication decisions upon library budgets); modes of credentialing scholarship and their impact upon professional advancement, with special attention to peer review and its (current?) discontents; scholarship as intellectual property and the most effective ways to manage that property and achieve scholarly goals; and issues in access and preservation as they relate to ensuring the future of the scholarly conversation. [First offered Fall 2014]
Prerequisites
LIS590AV AV Mat'ls in Libs & Archives [Audiovisual Materials in Libraries and Archives]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description As analog film, video, and audio materials and playback equipment become obsolete, libraries and archives with audiovisual (AV) materials in their collections face great challenges in preserving these materials. AV preservation and collection is costly, time-consuming, and requires specialized knowledge. This course will discuss the ways that librarians and archivists are responding to the challenges of audiovisual handling, preservation and collection. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590BB Bookbinding Hist, Princ, Pract [Bookbinding: History, Principles and Practice]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description A hands-on exploration of multiple styles of bookbinding. Students will acquire fundamental technical knowledge by creating a variety of book structures using traditional tools and materials. An appreciation of the history of bindings will be gained through readings, visits to the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the Conservation Lab and other field trips. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590BC Rare Book Cataloging
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Introduction to the cataloging of books from the hand-press period using the standards outlined by Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books). Exploration of concepts particular to rare books such as bibliographic format, edition, issue, and state. Application of controlled vocabularies/thesauri in a rare books context. Practical, hands-on experience cataloging rare books. Course assumes student will have a strong understanding of regular monographic cataloging and relevant sections of AACR2 (i.e., material covered in LIS 507). [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2009]
Prerequisites LIS 507 or permission of instructor.
LIS590BEL Building Broadband Communities
Credit 4 GR hours
Description [LEEP section of 590BE] This course will examine the implementation of broadband Internet networks in communities across the US and other countries. The course will cover broadband Internet policy in the US as it has evolved from US telecommunication policy; examine initiatives to build broadband Internet in the US and other countries including the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program; examine strategies to build broadband infrastructure in the US, examine the technologies used to build high-speed broadband infrastructure; and examine how to research and evaluate the social and economic impact of broadband investments. The course will include discussions with various broadband leaders and researchers from ongoing broadband projects in the US. [First offered Spring 2014]
Prerequisites
LIS590BG Business & Govt: Lit & Pract LIS [Business and Government: Literacy and Practice for LIS Profls]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of business, management, and government terminology, concepts, philosophy, and practices. Information professionals working in a corporate or government setting, as well as those in business reference in academic and large public libraries, can benefit from a grasp of basic finance concepts, organizational culture, the marketplace, and the competencies, skills, and tools needed to be influential strategic partners in their organizations. [First offered Summer 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590BK The Picture Book [The Picture Book: History, Art, and Visual Literacy]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description The origins, development, current status, and future potential of the children's picture book will be explored in depth in this intensive seminar. Concentrating primarily on the genre's 100-year-long American trajectory, participants will consider the picture book as: 1) a late nineteenth-century Industrial Era artifact and art form; 2) as an element of America's cultural legacy from Britain; 3) a lively proving ground for the contrasting philosophies of childhood of twentieth-century American librarian-critics and progressive educators; 4) the art form of choice of an extraordinary international roster of contemporary authors and illustrators; 5) as a barometer of mainstream America's changing attitudes toward its minority cultures; 6) as a bellwether of new design styles and printing technologies. Students will hone their critical skills as they also consider the larger question of the role of traditional print culture in our brave new media world. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590BP Library Buildings and Society [Library Buildings and Society: From Past to Present]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description A course based on the premise that library buildings, like all technologies, are shaped by society, including its needs, aspirations and ideologies. Will focus on the public library in the United States and Britain since the middle of the nineteenth century; however, other library types, periods and places will also be considered. This course is a complement to, not a substitute for, LIS 548, Library Buildings. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Spring 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590CA Community Archives [Community Archives: Documenting Heritage and Identity]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Community Archives are a collection of material that documents one or many aspects of a community's heritage, collected and preserved by that community and its members. These materials tell the story of groups of people who have often been excluded from mainstream archives, which have tended to focus on official documents and the lives of elites. We will investigate the role community archives play in supporting a sense of heritage and identity amongst members of a community and how they serve to raise awareness of these neglected stories in the wider public. Will work with local organizations that have agreed to take part, and students will contribute to the work of their archives by assisting in identifying records of long term value, documenting the experience of its members, providing the organization with practical and affordable solutions within a framework of best practice of archives and records management, and working collaboratively with the organizations to secure the long-term viability of their documentary heritage.[Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Colls] [First offered Spring 2010]
Prerequisites LIS 581, or consent of instructor.
LIS590CB Cataloging for School Libs [Cataloging for School Libraries]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course will introduce the student to the principles, practices and standards for information representation and organization in school media centers. Course content will include an introduction to original cataloging of non-standard materials (such as realia and audiovisual materials), evaluation of bibliographic records, exposure to authority control and subject access systems with a special focus on the Dewey Decimal System and Sears Subject Headings. The course will also provide an overview and exploration of different library systems/OPACS. [First offered Summer 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS590CD2 Current Topics in Coll Dev [Current Topics in Collection Development]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Explores current topics and problems related to the development and management of library collections. Addresses changes in scholarly communication and the production and distribution of information resources that impact planning and policy for building, budgeting, and providing access to collections. Examines issues related to developing libraries that blend traditional and digital materials, including economic challenges, cooperative strategies, and specific selection and evaluation practices. Provides an overview of current digital library projects and products. Conducted as a seminar, will revolve around discussion of readings and case material collected by students. Class sessions will cover contemporary problems and trends in the field. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration]
Prerequisites
LIS590CE Civic Entrepreneurship [Civic Entrepreneurship and Public Institutions]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course will prepare students to be civic innovators in libraries, other public institutions and community-based organizations. This course content will come primarily from the civic and social entrepreneurship literature and case studies of innovative and entrepreneurial librarians who are redefining the role of libraries in relation to the civic and social life of their communities. Students will gain a new understanding of how entrepreneurial public institutions can build the civic capacity needed to develop new approaches to public problems. Students will contribute to a new stream of research on civic entrepreneurship within the professions of the library, nonprofit, community-based, and public institutions, and civic-minded individuals. [A recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [First offered Spring 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590CI Community Info Systems
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Introduces community information systems, with an emphasis on community networks. Provides an opportunity to develop knowledge about community information and current issues in its creation, transfer and use. In this course, "community information system" is used broadly to designate any set of technologies, services, and content whose purpose is to supply information, primarily of a local nature, to members of a given geographic community. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration. A recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [First offered Spring 2005]
Prerequisites
LIS590CL Comics in Libraries
Credit 2 GR hours
Description A pragmatically-focused class, Comics in Libraries examines the particular challenges comics pose as library resources. Topics include collection management, discovery and access, description and representation, preservation, readers' services, and intellectual freedom as they pertain to comics in forms including comic strips, graphic novels, and manga. [First offered Summer 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590CM Change Management
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course provides students with a mix of theoretical and practical applications covering several aspects of change management. We will explore various methods and approaches for evaluating change management frameworks and best practices; understanding why change happens; successfully managing and influencing organizational change; how decision-making and leadership enables or inhibits change. This course will emphasize awareness and understanding on the causes and nature of change across different types of organizations; managing the impact of change; and practical application of the tools and skills required to enable successful leadership in response to a rapidly changing workplace. [Revised description effective Fall 2013; see Historical Catalog for earlier course description]
Prerequisites LIS 505 or consent of instructor.
LIS590CN Cataloging of Nonprint Matls [Cataloging of Nonprint Materials]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course provides practical application of and focus on the special problems of cataloging and classifying nonprint resources commonly encountered in most library settings. Topics covered include digital (e-books, databases, Web sites), cartographic, non-musical audio, and visual (moving and still images) resources using AACR2 and MARC 21. Special focus is given to the unique problems of nonprint media, classification issues, and current national standards and practices. [First offered Summer 2011]
Prerequisites LIS 507.
LIS590CP Rare Books, Crime & Punishment
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Explores crimes against culture in the form of rare books, maps, manuscripts and archival documents. From theft for profit to counterfeiting and vandalism, this class will focus on the myriad ways that unique and irreplaceable cultural heritage items are taken from us. The professional librarian and archivist communities, the general public and law enforcement have all treated these crimes very differently. This class will look at the ways that each of these communities reacts to these crimes and the reasons for these varied reactions. The class will also trace the evolution of the way these crimes have been viewed by various communities and what recent, positive changes might mean for the future. Aside from the historical and theoretical, this class will also discuss the practical: how these crimes are committed and by whom as well as how they can be (and are being) prevented. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Spring 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590CR Comics: Advising Readers [Comics: Advising Child and Adult Readers]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Comics--in forms including comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, webcomics, and manga--represent an important cultural medium, which appeals to persons of all ages and is collected by many school, public, and academic libraries. This course introduces students to the comics medium, its history, and its cultural influences. Students will read a variety of comics and learn about materials and techniques key to providing reader's advisory in this medium. Although this course focuses on American comics, some readings and discussions will touch on this medium's international dimensions. [First offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590CW Computer Supported Coop Work [Computer Supported Cooperative Work]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This doctoral level seminar will explore research issues related to collaborative computing. The focus will be mostly on issues of usability and acceptance of technologies into the work setting, and the design process to achieve that. This includes aspects of analysis, requirements specification, tailoring, usability, learnability, and their incorporation into applications development. Issues to be covered include: synchronous and asynchronous; remote and co-located collaboration; workplace use of systems including workflow systems; computer supported collaborative learning; home and leisure use of collaborative applications, barriers to technology adoption and how to overcome them; evaluation of collaborative systems; ethnographic techniques to inform systems analysis and design; interfaces to support human-human interaction; ubiquitous computing; mobile computing; lightweight interactions; roomware; very large and very small displays. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration]
Prerequisites Doctoral student; other graduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.
LIS590DA Research Data Analysis Mgt LIS [Research Data Analysis and Management in LIS]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description A survey of data analysis issues, tools, and management techniques for research in Library and Information Science and other disciplines. Topics include data theory, theories of measurement, data visualization, data encoding standards, and the assumptions of common analytic techniques. Students will locate and work with a data set of their choice, review the literature of recommended analysis methods, and prepare an analysis appropriate to the data set they have chosen. [First offered Spring 2000 as 450DA, Data Analysis for LIS Research, a doctoral seminar; title and description updated and doctoral seminar designation removed March 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590DB Descriptive Bibliography
Credit 2 GR hours
Description The main purpose of this course is to teach students to understand and to prepare detailed bibliographical descriptions of printed books. In order to prepare an accurate bibliographical description, it is necessary to have some knowledge of the physical components of the printed book (paper, ink, binding materials), as well as an understanding of the processes used to produce the book (typesetting, imposition, presswork, etc.). Will cover the methods of producing books (especially during the hand-press period), as well as the organization and preparation of bibliographical descriptions. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2010]
Prerequisites
LIS590DC Foundations of Data Curation
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Data curation is the active and on-going management of data through its lifecycle of interest and usefulness to scholarship, science, and education; curation activities and policies enable data discovery and retrieval, maintain data quality and add value, and provide for re-use over time. This course provides an overview of a broad range of theoretical and practical problems in this emerging field. Examines issues related to appraisal and selection, long-lived data collections, research lifecycles, workflows, metadata, legal and intellectual property issues. [Required course for Data Curation Concentration] [First offered Fall 2007]
Prerequisites Students enrolled in the Data Curation specialization have registration priority.
LIS590DG Digital Copyright & Licensing [Digital Copyright & Licensing: Legal & Policy Issues for Librarians]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Covers the changing nature of copyright law as necessitated by technological developments in digital environments. These changes impact many aspects of library services including collection development (in the context of licensing e-materials versus ownership of printed materials); interlibrary loans; digital archives and Internet preservation; support for distance education, electronic course reserves and class management systems (including the streaming of multi-media materials); liability for infringement as Internet service providers; as university or institutional support for best practices and policies facilitating compliance with copyright law; as advocates with government policy makers and the content producing industries to support laws that protect the interests of libraries, the arts and educational institutions. The course will be conducted primarily as a graduate level seminar, but it will also introduce library students to the methodologies of case law and statutory analysis to give basic insight into working with legal counsel and government policymakers. [First offered Summer 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS590DH Digital Humanities
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Will look at some of the history of digital humanities, examine some case studies of digital tools and methods applied to humanities material in the context of research, and consider the implications of such projects for libraries, both in terms of providing support to their creators and in terms of collecting the results. As a final project, each student will choose one digital humanities project and write a review essay about it, intended for publication: in that review, you'll consult with people involved in creating the project, and in your review essay you'll discuss the project's intended audience and use, its technical choices, its strategies for funding and sustainability, and its plans (if any) for eventual archiving of production records, and collection and curation of the product resulting from that process. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration] [First offered Spring 2005]
Prerequisites
LIS590DM Document Modeling
Credit 4 GR hours
Description An introduction to information modeling for text and documents emphasizing fundamental modeling principles and XML-related information processing standards. Specific topics include document analysis, modeling problems and techniques, markup metalanguages and schemas (including XML Schema and RelaxNG, as well as XML DTDs), and markup semantics. Several important markup systems in a variety of domains will be examined in detail, including TEI (for humanities texts), the National Library of Medicine's journal DTD (for STM publishing), and DocBook and Dita (for technical documentation). We draw on perspectives from formal language theory, data structures, and knowledge representation, and explore the relationships between grammar-based document modeling and other data modeling disciplines, such as the relational model and the entity-relationship model. Students will undertake a hands-on document modeling project. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration] [Updated description effective Fall 2012]
Prerequisites LIS 501 or consent of instructor
LIS590DP Document Processing
Credit 4 GR hours
Description An introduction to XML-based document processing technologies and standards appropriate to electronic publishing. Leveraging descriptive encoding in standard formats (XML, SGML, HTML), industry-standard styling and transformation technologies (XSLT, CSS) can be deployed within layered systems to create and maintain formatted publications on and off the web (in HTML, PDF and print). Course participants will build such a system on an open-source platform. Issues to be covered include processing architectures (batch, server-and client-side processing); "vertical" publishing formats such as Docbook, DITA, NLM/NCBI, TEI; validation and quality-assurance methods and technologies; ancillary production pipelines (SVG graphics, RSS/Atom feeds, "galley proof" versions); document metadata and aggregation; and the role of proprietary publishing applications. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration] [First offered Spring 2005]
Prerequisites LIS 452 or other programming experience
LIS590DT Data Mining
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Data mining refers to the process of exploring large datasets with the goal of uncovering interesting patterns. This process usually involves a number of tasks such as data collection, pre-processing, and characterization; model fitting, selection, and evaluation; classification, clustering, and prediction. Although data mining has its roots in database management, it has grown into a discipline that focuses on algorithm design (to ensure computational feasibility) and statistical modeling (to separate the signal from the noise). It draws heavily upon a variety of other disciplines including statistics, machine learning, operations research, and information retrieval. Will cover the major data mining concepts, principles, and techniques that *every information scientist should know about.* Lectures will introduce and discuss the major approaches to data mining; computer lab sessions coupled with assignments will provide hands-on experience with these approaches; term projects offer the opportunity to use data mining in a novel way. Mathematical detail will be left to the students who are so inclined. [First offered Spring 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590DU Info Svcs for Diverse Users [Information Services for Diverse Users]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Given the increasing diversity of information users in society, information professionals need to learn more about specific groups in orderprovide appropriate services. This course is designed to prepare future information professionals to develop and provide inclusive services to underrepresented populations, and to analyze and evaluate services to ensure equality of access to information in a range ofinstitutional settings. Through readings, discussion, guest lectures, and site visits, students will explore diversity issues that impact information services and develop skills for planning, implementing, and evaluating programs and services foraddressing these issues. Specific diversity issues include race and ethnicity; education; language; literacy; disability; gender and sexual orientation; social class; national origin; physical, psychological, and learning ability; and age. [First offered Fall 2013]
Prerequisites LIS 502 is recommended as a prerequisite or taken concurrently.
LIS590EB Enum Desc Hist & Text Bibliog [Enumerative, Descriptive, Historical and Textual Bibliography]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Scholars, librarians, archivists, students, and others interested in the book as an artifact (for any purpose: buying or selling, cataloging, acquiring, deaccessioning, collecting, publishing, editing, or other tasks) must have a firm grasp of the four main branches of bibliography: Enumerative, Descriptive, Historical, and Textual. We will elucidate what these related fields focus on, showing interrelationships, and preparing practitioners to speak with authority about books as bearers of texts and as artifacts. Looks at such things as how to compile and focus, design and present an enumerative bibliography; how to describe books (esp. those from the hand-press period--up through about 1800) for cataloging, buying, selling, and doing scholarly research; the book as a historical artifact, with respect to its creation, dissemination, and the effect it had on the culture (along with the effect the culture had on the world of publishing); the development of authoritative, accurately and definitively edited texts; and more. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [Summer 2005, 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590EE Info Mgmt in Emerging Environs [Information Management in Emerging Environments]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Will study approaches to providing access to information created, stored, and published in novel, emerging contexts. Focuses on methods of information retrieval, recommendation systems, and related empirical, computational approaches to document management. Emerging areas to be covered in the class include (but are not limited to): social networks, mobile computing, special problems in modern Web retrieval, and e-commerce. Though the course has no prerequisites aside from graduate standing, students familiar with core problems and techniques of information retrieval and proficiency in elementary probability and statistics will be especially well prepared for the course's subject matter. [First offered Spring 2011]
Skill Familiarity with core problems and techniques of information retrieval and proficiency in elementary probability and statistics
Prerequisites Doctoral student; other graduate students must have permission of instructor to enroll.
LIS590EL E-Learning [E-Learning: Social and Technical Issues in E-learning Research and Practice]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This seminar addresses social, technical, administrative, and pedagogical aspects of online education and learning. The course will primarily address e-learning in higher education, and but will also consider e-learning in non-educational settings. We will discuss technical and social challenges and new practices associated with teaching and learning online, as well as theoretical perspectives on e-learning, methods of researching e-learning, and research progress and agendas. Attention will be given to examining the online environment as a whole, including how computer-mediated communication affects interaction between students and instructors, and among instructors; how learning communities are built and sustained online; how students learn how to learn online; and social and technical aspects of sustaining online programs. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration] [First offered Fall 2005]
Prerequisites
LIS590EP Electr Pub: Techs & Practices [Electronic Publishing: Technologies and Practices]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description An introduction to electronic publishing with a focus on the practices, standards, and issues affecting digital librarians and information managers working in the academic sphere. After an introduction to basic concepts and issues, the course presents a set of essential technical concepts and approaches, including metadata standards, XML encoding languages and schema design, and publication tools. Examines the social and institutional issues that shape electronic publishing practices, including preservation, data curation, open access, accessibility. Guest lectures and case studies provide an opportunity to look at real-world implementations and practical tradeoffs. Assignments are organized around a student-designed electronic publishing project in which students combine hands-on practice with analysis. No technical knowledge is assumed but students having no prior exposure to XML publishing should be prepared for a fairly swift initial immersion. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections and the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration]
Prerequisites
LIS590ER E-Resources Management
Credit 4 GR hours
Description In-depth exploration of current topics in the rapidly changing world of e-resources management in libraries and information centers. Discusses trends, problems, and issues relating to how e-resources are reshaping the entire spectrum of library service. Example areas of focus include open access publishing, scholarly communication, proprietary as well as open source e-resources management systems, licensing and copyright issues, consortia, usage statistics, balancing e-resources with more traditional collections and services, and intellectual access challenges in a highly diffuse information environment. [Updated title and course description effective Fall 2013.]
Prerequisites LIS 578 or consent of instructor.
LIS590EV Eval Programs and Services [Evaluating Programs and Services]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course provides both a theoretical base and an application base for the design and conduct of evaluations. The course includes an introduction to evaluation by reviewing history. It also provides a review of several landmark events and theoretical foundations of evaluation. The remainder of the course is focused on designing evaluations that can be applied to real needs that exists in the LIS context. This course will view the LIS context very broadly to include libraries, museums, retrieval system, and other technology based processes. Students will be able to fit the content of this course to their own specialization or work context. Outcome evaluation will be emphasized in the course, but other forms of evaluation will be included.
Prerequisites
LIS590EX Library and Museum Exhibitions [Planning, Production & Practice of Lib & Museum Exhibitions]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Exhibitions are essential for special collections, whether the collection is part of a traditional academic rare book library, an archive, a public library, an historical society, a museum, or any other institution with special collections. Producing high quality exhibitions ought to be a primary goal of such cultural institutions because it is through exhibits that we interpret our collections to a broader audience. This course will offer practical instruction on the organization, planning, and research that go into any exhibit. Conservation issues will also be discussed in the course, with topics ranging from getting items into exhibit-worthy condition to the potential damage that an exhibition environment can cause and how to minimize it. Each student will produce a small exhibit with a paper or online catalog. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2010]
Prerequisites
LIS590FB FRBR as a Conceptual Model
Credit 4 GR hours
Description The International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) has developed a conceptual model for information objects: the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR). FRBR has been influential in the library community and holds promise as a model for all information objects, including those in the digital world. We will analyze FRBR as a general purpose conceptual model, with particular attention to applications in data curation, publishing, and digital humanities. The connection with fundamental issues in traditional formal ontology will be emphasized throughout. Although there are no specific prerequisites this course will be conducted as an advanced seminar. Although some basic familiarity in ER/UML modeling languages or elementary symbolic logic is recommended the relevant concepts will be reviewed during the course. [First offered Fall 2014]
Prerequisites
LIS590FL Folklore: Communication and Culture
Credit 4 GR hours
Description [Meets with CMN 529FL] A graduate level introduction to research in folklore, defined here as a pervasive mode of informal, non-commercial communication. We will explore some of the history of folklore scholarship, collecting and archiving, and look at folklorists' methods of study, analysis and interpretation. These range from the collection of "folklore texts" in isolation to the ethnography of whole communities, including dispersed and diasporic communities. Special concerns of the course include folklore as an entrée to community self-documentation, cultural preservation (in the wake of wars and disasters, for example) and problems of intellectual freedom and cultural ownership. [Formerly a doctoral seminar and titled "Folklore: Fireplace to Cyberspace". Title and description updated Fall 2009 and doctoral seminar designation removed]
Prerequisites Graduate student
LIS590FR Intellect Freedom & Censorship [Intellectual Freedom and Censorship]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Examines intellectual freedom issues throughout the United States and the world. It approaches intellectual freedom as a social justice issue based in interpretations of the First Amendment and the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights. The course encourages information professionals to view commitment to intellectual freedom as a core professional value. Finally, the course gives students the opportunity to develop skills and strategies needed to navigate censorship controversies in the workplace. [First offered Fall 2012]
Prerequisites LIS 502 or consent of instructor
LIS590GE Genealogy and Library Service
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Provides a basic knowledge of U.S. genealogical and family history research, and explores ways in which librarians can best serve researchers in this field. This course will familiarize you with how to gather the major sources used in family history research, as well as how to properly analyze, organize, and document them. A variety of sources, both print and digital, will be covered including vital, census, church, military and land records. In addition to readings and lectures, students will complete a series of assignments in order to acquire research skills. Note: Students enrolled for 4 hours of credit will be required to complete a compiled genealogy and some personal monetary expenses should be expected of students completing this project (e.g., expenses incurred for ordering records, etc.). Acquiring the necessary documents could cost approximately $100.00 to $200.00, but this amount will vary depending on where the documents are located, and if any are available in online databases. [First offered Spring 2013; slight change in description June 2013]
Prerequisites LIS 504
LIS590GL Local Regional Global LIS [Local, Regional and Global Intersections in Library & Information Sci]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course explores traditions and trends in library and information science (LIS) from a global perspective incorporating local and regional intersections. Participants consider diverse information contexts emphasizing LIS subfields including archives, community informatics, data curation, information policy, LIS education, and youth services. [Required course for joint African Studies/LIS Master's degree] [First offered Spring 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS590GN Conservation of General Colls [Conservation of General Collections]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Focuses on the physical care of general book collections. Students will learn how to complete basic repairs for circulating (i.e. general collection) book materials, and how to manage and support these repairs in the context of a library collection and other library activities, such as digitization. Class work will consist of a combination of traditional lectures and reading as well as hands-on projects in book repair and protection. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590HB History of the Book
Credit 2 only, 4 only, or 2 or 4 GR hours (may vary in any given semester)
Description This course will cover a wide variety of topics concerned with the history and development of the book, both as a physical object and as the bearer of intellectual content. Discussions will explore different aspects of written materials, including the physical properties of the objects that carry text and image (e.g., papyrus, paper, parchment, etc.) and their cultural and intellectual function. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2006]
Prerequisites
LIS590HBA History of the Book
Credit 2 only, 4 only, or 2 or 4 GR hours (may vary in any given semester)
Description [LEEP section of 590HB] This course will cover a wide variety of topics concerned with the history and development of the book, both as a physical object and as the bearer of intellectual content. Discussions will explore different aspects of written materials, including the physical properties of the objects that carry text and image (e.g., papyrus, paper, parchment, etc.) and their cultural and intellectual function. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2006]
Prerequisites
LIS590HCI Human-Centered Info Retrieval [Human-Centered Information Retrieval]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Human-Centered information retrieval (HCIR) engages aspects of information retrieval that bear specifically on peoples' experiences with retrieval systems and processes. This course will entail a sustained engagement with the literature, theories, and techniques that comprise HCIR. The course will include a historical overview of HCIR's development. But it will focus mainly on emerging research and innovations in the field. Major areas of discussion will include theories of relevance, modes of system interaction (e.g. retrieval, browsing, recommendation), interaction design, and the evaluation of HCIR systems. Aside from doctoral standing, the course has no formal prerequisites. However, students will benefit from previous exposure to information retrieval, human-computer interaction, and aspects of statistics such as linear models and basic probability. [First offered Spring 2012]
Prerequisites Doctoral student.
LIS590HE Higher Educ and Info Prof'ls [Higher Education and Information Professionals]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Introduces the higher education environment in which academic librarians and other information professionals operate in order to prepare students for leadership roles both within academic libraries and in their parent institutions. This course will explore a variety of issues including: history and organization of higher education; accreditation; characteristics of students; roles of faculty and other campus professionals; and current issues and challenges. [First offered Spring 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590HF History & Foundations of LIS [History and Foundations of Library and Information Science]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course introduces students to the historical foundations of library and information science and provides a basis for exploring more recent theoretical and experimental developments. The course examines the complex interactions of socio-cultural, technological and professional factors underlying the emergence and current status of LIS as a field of investigation and practice. It also suggests the relevance of historical study to fundamental and continuing problems of information management, despite the technological and organizational developments that have occurred over the centuries. The required reading is wide ranging but highly selected given the course's scope. This course is required of all first semester PhD students. [First offered Fall 2004]
Prerequisites Required of first-semester LIS doctoral students
LIS590HI Healthcare Infrastructure [Computer Science is lead dept.]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description [Meets with CS 598HI] Healthcare is the largest industry in the country, but the current infrastructure for providing healthcare is not viable. Recent advances in information technology promise radically different infrastructure that could provide a viable model for providing healthcare. This course will examine healthcare infrastructure through lectures and discussions, through text readings and web sites. There is a particular focus on measuring the health of populations, in the demographic era of chronic illness. Information sources are discussed in detail from medical literature and records to health brochures and monitors. There are no pre-requisites for this course, but students encouraged to use background experiences. Practical topics will be emphasized with the aim of revolutionizing an industry in transition. A semester project will be required, on information technology aspects of population health measurement. [First offered Fall 2007]
Skill Programming background helpful
Prerequisites Doctoral student; other graduate students may enroll with permission of instructor
LIS590HR History of Readers
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This doctoral seminar will encourage multi-disciplinary approaches to studying readers at any point in the past, whether centuries ago or more recent times. Assigned readings will engage critical theory, exemplary histories of readers, and evidence of reading and challenges to usual historical methodologies. Students will gain in-depth understanding of reading populations, from individuals to communities, and grapple with issues of what counts as valid historical evidence for making arguments about the typically ephemeral process of reading. [First offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites Doctoral student
LIS590HS Digital Public History [Digital Public History: An Introduction]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Prepares students to develop critical thinking skills about, and innovative ways to implement and advocate for, collaborations among institutions and diverse publics around the construction of public histories. The National Council on Public History defines public history as collaborations "to make the past useful to the public." This course focuses on how such collaborations develop, and what role librarians, archivists, museum professionals, academics and others can, do and may play in this changing terrain. [Elective for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2012]
Prerequisites Master's student from any discipline
LIS590HT Hist Bookbinding: Mech & Matls [History of Bookbinding: Mechanics & Materials]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This class will explore the history of bookbinding by making models of historical book structures. Students will visit the Rare Book and Manuscript Library to see examples of bindings of different periods and will then return to the classroom to create a set of models to have on hand for presentation to students and visitors as librarians. [First offered Summer 2014]
Prerequisites
LIS590I Indexing and Abstracting
Credit 2 GR hours [half session]; 4 GR hours [full semester]
Description The practice and underlying theories for two basic operations in information systems and service, in print and electronic form. [LEEP sections are 590ILE and 590IL2]
Prerequisites LIS 501, or consent of instructor
LIS590IBL Inquiry-based Learning
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description The primary goal is to provide an introduction to a way of thinking about learning as it occurs in libraries, museums, homes, and workplaces, as well as in formal educational settings. In order to explore that, we will read about, observe, and engage in inquiry- based learning. We will examine the creation of environments in which learners are actively engaged in making meaning through personal and collaborative inquiry. The course will also examine challenges to inquiry-based instruction, including those related to management, assessment, basic skills, cultural differences, and pedagogical goals. [A recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [Credit hours updated 11/17/09 from 4 hours only to variable credit]
Prerequisites
LIS590IC Information Consulting
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description The Information Consulting (IC) course is designed to serve as a capstone course for the students who have geared their studies around business information resources and services. Students will be challenged to identify appropriate resources and develop deliverables for their clients to solve complex business problems. Corporate partners will help design projects that can provide "real-world" experience for students and also help evaluate the final deliverables. The course readings and discussion will focus on a necessary framework for understanding the role of the information specialist in the corporate setting. Students will draw from the lessons learned in earlier courses in business information services. The projects will require the teams to locate and synthesize information, and then present final deliverables to the clients. [Prerequisite removed for Spring 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS590ICI Change & Identity in Info Sys [Change and Identity in Information Systems]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Some of the most challenging research problems in contemporary information organization and management involve the representation of change and identity in digital information systems. Preservation, versioning, authentication, integrity assurance, format conversion, data provenance, and the use of unique identifiers are just a few examples of activities that require modeling identity and change in digital objects. As common as such activities are some fundamental problems in conceptualization of change and identity for digital objects remain unsolved. Solving these problems will require facing some of the most profound issues in the ontology of information and information systems. This course explores several foundational topics in this area; it uses logic-based formal methods and is conducted in a seminar format.
Prerequisites Doctoral student status or permission of the instructor; a working knowledge of elementary predicate logic.
LIS590ID Information Dynamics
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description All information changes. New terms, structures, content, use-contexts, copying/proliferation, links, and re-interpretation all mean information is dynamic in location, format, uses, meanings, and effects. This course introduces models and strategies for understanding, managing, and exploiting information dynamics, both large-scale and micro. Topics include technical, social, modeling, analysis, and empirical foundations; rate and impact metrics; the Information Dynamics meta-model; social-analysis, selectionist, self-organizing, population dynamics, and game-based approaches; growth and change in information networks; information flows; semiotic and opinion dynamics; preservation (stabilization) dynamics; Applications in indexes, metadata, "tagging", "social software," web ranking, collaborative problem solving/learning, bioinformatics, etc. Activities include reading, analysis, active modeling, and empirical case studies. Audience: students wanting strong foundations for technical or policy activities involving dynamic organizational-to-global scale information environments.
Prerequisites
LIS590IE Information and Empire
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Examines the expansion and contraction of empires through the lens of information history. Given the geography and cultural heterogeneity of imperial states, the collection, interpretation and use of information in the context of empire is an especially rich topic of study. This class will focus on the rise and decline of the European empires from the fifteenth century to Indian independence in 1947. Making use of exciting new work on colonialism, post-colonialism, science and technology, we will explore the intersecting histories of information, knowledge and power. [First offered Spring 2010]
Prerequisites
LIS590IF Intell Freedom Lib Svcs Youth [Intellectual Freedom and Library Services for Youth]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course examines the intellectual freedom issues that affect children and young adults, including the censorship of books and student publications and the use of Internet filtering software in libraries and schools. In addition, it explores cultural factors that affect young people's reading and viewing choices, including literary awards, mass media, youth culture, youth activism, and corporate marketing to youth. This course provides an opportunity for in-depth discussion of censorship controversies and developing the skills and strategies needed to navigate them.
Prerequisites
LIS590IH Information History
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Information history covers diverse institutions and practices, from libraries and postal systems to cartography and statistics, and connects these to overarching historical processes. This course examines the role of information in the transition to capitalism; in processes of state formation; in industrialization, and in other important historical movements and events. [First offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590II Interfaces to Info Systems [Interfaces to Information Systems]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course will provide an introduction to the following: Issues in Human Computer Interaction; Analysis of interfaces and their use; Synthesis: the design process as an engineering activity; Designing usable interfaces under constraints of resources; The rapid prototyping and evaluation cycle; Metacognition: learning how to learn and to operate in this domain as a reflective, continually improving professional. Considers how people use information systems such as on-line public access catalogues, CD-Roms, bibliographic databases, digital libraries, world wide web pages, web search engines, etc. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration]
Prerequisites Some basic experience of using the web and designing simple web pages using rudimentary HTML; experience in using a range of computing applications.
LIS590IN Information Networks
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course explores the structures, processes and implications of information networks. It stresses the generality of human information networks in communities, organizations, and society, not just computer/communication networks or the Web. We cover foundations for understanding these networks (data, modeling, experimentation, and analysis). Then we study numerous specific relationships between network structures, information content, community aims/needs, economic factors, styles of network growth/decay, and network impacts. Settings for classwork and projects include community networks, blog networks, hypertexts and other document networks, information producer/supplier networks, knowledge networks, expertise networks, federated libraries, etc. [First offered Fall 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590IP Information Policy
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Introduces information policy concepts and issues with which library, archival, and information science practitioners need to be familiar. The course will consider information policy in the U.S. and global contexts; the policy process and players; individual policies which influence information creation and access; and how librarians and other information professionals participate in policy development. [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries] [Description updated Spring 2012]
Prerequisites
LIS590IS Information in Society
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Drawing on classic and cutting-edge research on the system of information provision, this course provides conceptual foundations for historical, political-economic and policy analysis of information institutions and infrastructures. [First offered Fall 2008]
Prerequisites Doctoral student
LIS590ISM Information Service Marketing
Credit 2 only, 4 only, or 2 or 4 GR hours [may vary in a given semester]
Description Examines all aspects of non-profit marketing, including the basic principles of marketing, and their application to a wide variety of settings, particularly non-profits, and applying the principles in an evaluation of an information service provider, carrying out basic market research for this provider, and writing a basic marketing plan. The goals of this course are: to provide a theoretical foundation that can be applied to many different organizational settings, particularly non-profits; to apply these theoretical concepts to a real-world situation comparable to the settings in which you will be employed; to develop team and leadership organization, communication and planning skills.
Prerequisites
LIS590ISP Social History of US Telecom [Social History of U.S. Telecommunications]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course seeks to render a broad historical portrait of the range and character of a vital producer and consumer service: telecommunications. Episodes of social conflict over the institutional purpose of telecommunications are accorded emphasis in our effort to set changing industry structures and public policies within the larger and longer-term historical movement of American society. [Section title change effective Fall 2013]
Prerequisites Doctoral student. Other graduate students need permission of instructor to enroll.
LIS590LA Libship for Latin Amer Studies [Librarianship for Latin American, Iberian and Latina Studies]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course will include coverage of reference and resources; collection development; and professional activities in librarianship with a focus on Latin American, Iberian, and Latina Studies. [First offered Spring 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590LF Libraries in Film
Credit 4 hours
Description Feature films are not just a form of entertainment; as time passes, they become historical documents that throw light on the societies that produced them. In this course we will view a selection of films released in the second half of the twentieth century that have librarians as their main protagonists. In association with both primary sources and secondary readings we will use the films as vehicles for analyzing and discussing various phases of, and episodes in, US and UK library history. [First offered Spring 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS590LG Library Gaming Programs
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Covers the design, implementation, assessment, marketing, and sustainment of gaming programs in public, school, and academic libraries, and other community or institutional settings. Surveys games for different demographic groups, and explores methods for integration of gaming with other library programming. Reviews the history of recreational gaming and the use of games in research, educational, and clinical contexts. [First offered Summer 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS590LI Legal Issues in LIS [Legal Issues in Library and Other Information Settings]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description A detailed exploration of the legal issues arising in various library settings, including access rights, privacy and confidentiality, copyright, intellectual freedom and information liability and malpractice. There are three objectives: 1) to understand the nature and scope of legal problems arising in the operation of the library; 2) to identify the responsibilities that library and information professionals have in executing current law and the opportunities available to effect necessary change; and 3) to evaluate current legal responses to such problems and envision alternative responses, both legal and non-legal, in light of sound information concepts. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2005]
Prerequisites
LIS590LL Law Librarianship
Credit 2 or 4 hours
Description Explores the various types of law libraries and functions within the law library, including legal reference, technical services, management, and collection development. Introduces special issues related to working with legal materials and law library patrons. Weekly readings and discussion will provide history and foundations of the field and an exploration of current issues and trends in the profession. Students will present a research paper on a topic related to the future of law librarianship. [First offered Summer 2009]
Prerequisites LIS 530 G or GLE, or permission of instructor.
LIS590LP Letterpress Printing [History and Techniques of Letterpress Printing]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course explores the history and techniques of fine printing (letterpress), looks at classics of typography and printing in examples from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and provides technical instruction in typesetting and press operation. Students will have exposure to the conceptual, intellectual, and aesthetic considerations of printing and printmaking. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2007]
Prerequisites
LIS590LW Web Design Construct Organizs [Web Design and Construction for Organizations]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course focuses on the basics of web site design, content development, constructing web pages with standard HTML and CSS. We will also cover usability and accessibility, content management system options, multi-media and interactivity in the context of standard HTML and CSS, procedures and policies for organizations, with a concentration on public, academic and special libraries. Students will investigate, design, and draft a representative site. Students may work work with non-profit and library clients in constructing and redesigning their web sites or design and construct their own personal professional pages. [Revised description effective Summer 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS590MA Methods in Lib & Info History [Methods and Approaches in Library and Information History]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description The study of libraries and librarianship has a long pedigree. However, methodological rigor has not always been a constant among scholars in the field. This course emphasizes the importance of sound historical method in library and information history. It identifies the sources available to scholars and highlights some debates that have arisen in recent decades. The historiography of the field is tapped and the variety of approaches discussed. Attention is paid to the recent development of information history. There will be 6-7 weeks of front-loaded teaching, reading, and discussion. Thereafter, students undertake an independent study based on primary sources. [First offered SP10; switched to a doctoral seminar with revised description Spring 2012]
Prerequisites PhD student campuswide
LIS590MC Medieval Codicology [Medieval Codicology: The Medieval Book from Sheep to Shelf]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Looks at the emergence of the codex as the primary form of book in the West. We shall consider the physical and intellectual developments of the codex, from the writing of the text to its final presentation on the page. Students will follow the text from the author to the book designers to the scribe to the illustrator to the binder to the reader, with stops along the way concentrating on tools, design, layout, ruling, illumination, and binding. We shall also look at modern approaches to codicology, including monastic versus commercial scriptoria, editing a medieval manuscript, paleography, dating, establishing provenance, and so forth. And we shall answer the question: What should a scholarly edition of a medieval text look like? [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS590ME Social Media & Global Change
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course covers the impact of global and national computer networks on politics, culture, and social relations overseas during a time of upheaval and revolutionary change. Guest lectures will be given by informatics practitioners and scholars with expertise on specific world regions. Topics may include the new social media, the politics and culture of the internet, hacktivism, cyber warfare, and mobile telephony and their role in the formation, dissemination, manipulation, and suppression of public opinion in Russia/Eurasia, the China/Pacific region, Central/South America, as well as Africa, Iran, and the Middle East. [First offered as a 590 Fall 2014, for Grad students only; previously offered as 490SMU/SMG for both UG and Grad students]
Prerequisites
LIS590MG Project Management for LIS
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Project management skills are essential for LIS practitioners who want to be leaders. Effective project management is needed to create everything from digital libraries, to community informatics outreach projects, to new physical library facilities. This is a comprehensive course in project management for anyone who is serious about planning and managing successful projects. This course combines knowledge, tools and techniques that are common to managing successful projects in any field with insight into the special challenges of managing projects in the LIS field. General project management subjects covered include a framework for project management, as well as the key project management knowledge areas: integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communication, risk, and procurement. Specific LIS project management subjects covered include the demand for project management skills in libraries, case studies of projects in both large and small libraries, and methods for addressing the special challenges of digital library projects. [First offered Summer 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590MM Medieval Manuscripts [Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course is an intensive introduction to medieval manuscripts, asking such questions as who made manuscripts, how they were written and assembled, who illuminated them and why, the ways they were used, and how they have survived. It will look at some of the most famous types of illuminated manuscripts, including Bibles, Books of Hours and literary texts. It will explain how to identify texts and fragments, how to read and date medieval scripts, and how to gain access to original manuscripts across the world. It will look at the market for medieval manuscripts, both in the Middle Ages and today, and it will discuss manuscript libraries and collectors. The course will include ample access to original medieval manuscripts, and practical work involving actual examples from at least the eleventh century to the renaissance. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS590MT Informetrics
Credit 4 GR hour
Description Informetrics refers to quantitative measurements of information resources such as bibliographic databases and the world wide web. It has its roots in bibliometrics (e.g., to study patterns of publication, citation, and collaboration behavior) and has a long history of being applied in scientometrics (e.g., to assess scientific productivity). Recently, it has been expanded to include webometrics (e.g., to characterize the structure and growth of the world wide web), and other domain specific-metrics. Lectures and discussion will broadly survey the literature on informetrics and study specific cases in depth, striking a balance between fundamental principles vs. applications that demonstrate the value of informetrics. Computer laboratory sessions and assignments will include the use of datasets and tools to teach how to perform informetric analyses. Term projects offer the opportunity to address novel informetrics-related research questions and can be tailored to the students' own interests. [First offered Fall 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590MY Global Con & Soc Jus Youth Lit [Global Contexts and Social Justice in Youth Literature]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Examines books, media, and other resources for young people (ages 0-18) in a multicultural, globalized, and increasingly digital media-saturated world. Explores the history of multicultural writing for the young, and major issues and debates of youth literature concerning diversity, racism, power, ideology, etc. Guides students to better select, interpret, evaluate, and promote such literature, media, and resources according to young people's various needs (intellectual, emotional, social and physical). [New title and revised description effective Summer 2013]
Prerequisites
LIS590NA Network Analysis
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This interdisciplinary course introduces students to fundamental theories, concepts, methods and applications of network analysis. Students learn how to approach network analysis in an informed, systematic and analytically rigorous fashion. At the end of the course, students will be able to design, manage and execute network analysis projects for scholarly and commercial use, and to critically assess network studies. [First offered Fall 2012]
Skill No programming skills required
Prerequisites
LIS590OD Ontology Development
Credit 4 GR hours
Description An introduction to formal ontology focusing on development and implementation issues and contemporary ontology software tools and languages. In spring of 2008 we will use as example ontologies one for museum and heritage information (CIDOC-CRM) and one for biological information (the Functional Model of Anatomy). Students may also do projects on other ontologies in other areas if they wish. The ontology editor Protege will be used throughout and the representation of ontologies in W3C semantic web languages RDF(S) and OWL will be emphasized. [First offered Spring 2008]
Prerequisites LIS 501
LIS590OH Ontologies in Humanities
Credit 4 GR hours
Description An exploration of formal ontologies and conceptual models for information representation in humanities research, culture and heritage management, museum documentation, and related areas. Special attention will be given to the ICM/CIDOC Content Reference Model (for museum documentation) and its relationship to IFLA's Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records. Although no specific prior knowledge is required the course is conducted in a seminar format and focuses on theoretical topics.
Prerequisites LIS 501 or consent of instructor
LIS590OHT Oral History: Theory & Pract [Oral History: Theory & Practice]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Introduces the theory and practice of oral history to graduate students in history, communication, library and information science and related fields through reading, discussion and practice with field work and interviewing. Over the last fifty years, oral history has moved from a controversial (and sometimes despised) technique on the margins of the discipline history, to one of the most important forms of historical knowledge production and dissemination in the academic and non-academic worlds. Yet its goals and relations to the communities it touches are often less than clear. Examines oral historical works, some canonical, some experimental, produced by historians, anthropologists, folklorists, sociologists and political activists. Up for discussion are questions of orality and literacy, privileged versus marginal histories, the problem of memory, problems of listening and learning how to ask, and debates about audience and presentation. Readings will cross continents (the Americas, Europe, Africa, South America) and historical periods from the 18th through the 21st centuries. [First offered Spring 2012]
Prerequisites graduate student
LIS590ON Ontologies in Natural Science
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course explores the application of formal ontology and related information modeling techniques in the natural sciences, focusing particularly on the biological and medical sciences. There are no specific prerequisites and the necessary background will be presented as part of the course, but students should have an antecedent interest in these topics and be prepared to make routine use of symbolic languages. [First offered Fall 2006]
Prerequisites
LIS590OPR Open Problems in IS Research [Open Problems in Information Science Research]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This seminar examines the nature of research contributions in information science, and the relationships among pure and applied research. Topics include how to identify basic research questions, situate them with respect to the literature, and articulate them in research proposals.
Prerequisites PhD student
LIS590PA Personal Archiving
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Examines issues related to personal archives. It is intended for students with a wide range of backgrounds. Students will gain a better understanding of relationships between traditional archival theories and practices and more personal forms of collecting. The class will begin with an introduction to basic archival concepts and theories, followed by perspectives on personal archives from archivists and other researchers. The class will also include discussions of several types of personal archival materials, including photo albums and photos, scrapbooks, and family history and genealogy materials. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590PB Book Collecting [History and Practices of Book Collecting]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description An introduction to the history and practices of book collecting, with particular emphasis on collecting and collectors in Britain and America from the eighteenth century to the present. Most special collections libraries are actually "collections of collections," and most of these collections were assembled by private book collectors who followed the tastes and collecting principles and standards of their own times. The course will cover these changing tastes and fashions in book collecting over the last several centuries, as well as the various ways that collectors have regarded rarity, condition, association, and provenance. The gradual broadening of collectors' ideas of the scope of subjects suitable for the formation of a collection will also be included. The course does not assume any prior experience with rare books - all necessary terminology will be covered in the course readings and lectures. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2009]
Prerequisites
LIS590PC Preserv & Conserv Colls Care [Preservation and Conservation for Collections Care]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course, meant to build on previous coursework in Preservation, Special Collections and/or Rare Book Curation, will focus on the physical structure and chemical composition of book, paper, and photographic materials. Students will learn how historic and modern library and archives materials are produced, how they age and potentially deteriorate, and different approaches for their physical care. Class work will be split between traditional lectures and readings as well as hands-on projects in book construction and minimally invasive treatments and stabilization mechanisms. The goal will be to educate students to a level at which they can effectively communicate with conservation and preservation professionals, as well as set educated priorities and expectations for the care of their collections. An additional course materials fee will be assessed to the student's tuition & fees bill. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2008]
Prerequisites LIS 582 or LIS 590RB, or consent of instructor.
LIS590PDP Perspectives Digital Preserv [Perspectives on Digital Preservation]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This seminar examines recent attempts to create both theoretical and methodological frameworks for insuring the long-term preservation of digital materials. Drawing upon previous work in information theory, literary theory, social theory and diplomatics, students in the course will critically examine a variety of recent efforts to establish standards and best practices for digital preservation. The course will emphasize exploring the interplay of technological and social issues involved in digital preservation, including matters of authenticity and trust, integrity of information, ownership and intellectual property, and the application of concepts such as authorial intent in recent digital preservation initiatives such as the Variable Media Network. The class will be conducted as a seminar centered on discussion of readings as well as student interests. Students will be expected to lead class discussions and provide updates on their own research over the course of the semester.
Prerequisites CAS or Doctoral student; Master's students may enroll with consent of instructor.
LIS590PEI Political Economy of Info [The Political Economy of Information]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Examines the contemporary transformation of information provision as a political economic process, by focusing on how and why the dynamic of capitalist development continues to be re-centered around information. What role has been played in this transition by innovations in information and communications technologies (ICTs), and by social actors, notably including government agencies, corporations, and informationally focused organizations such as libraries, universities, schools and museums? What have been the chief modalities of information market development, or "commodification"? How does information commodification both build upon and alter existing international political economic relationships? How does informationalization impinge on capitalist development overall? No prerequisites are needed to take this course; a research paper is required.
Prerequisites doctoral student
LIS590PH Public Library History & Ideology [Public Library History: Ideology, Sociology, and Economy]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Public libraries originated in the middle of the nineteenth century. Popularly perceived as an uncomplicated institution, the public library has in fact been the site of intense struggles concerning its legitimacy and purpose. The course examines these struggles mainly in the context of Britain and the United States, but with some comparative examples from elsewhere also. A main feature of the course is the use made of primary sources in the diet of required readings. [First offered Spring 2012]
Prerequisites Master's student
LIS590PM Paper in the Scholarly World
Credit 2 GR hours
Description [The Manufacture, Description, Uses, and Preservation of Paper in the Scholarly World] This course is an introduction to the world of paper with respect to rare books--their manufacture, materials, properties, uses, decoration, collection, sale, distribution, description, editing, preservation, and conservation, along with the preferred vocabulary of the medium. In this course students will be presented with a large vocabulary, pertaining to the range of surfaces of human communication, from stone to clay to several kinds of proto-papers (papyrus, vellum, bark paper, tapa cloth, and so forth) to the real thing--paper, in its myriad manifestations. The knowledge imparted by this class should be useful for anyone who deals with the medium, who describes it, shelves it, buys or sells it, preserves it, repairs it, or even just admires it. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2007]
Prerequisites
LIS590PO The Book as Physical Object
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Examines all the PHYSICAL aspects of books and how these inform us of the books' manufacture and place in a scholarly world. Covers all aspects of book production, from the earliest books to computers, and concentrates on their physical aspects. The course will look at all kinds of manifestations and features of codices that will useful in cataloging and bibliographical description, in reading scholarly bibliographies, in deciphering booksellers' catalogs, and in describing copy-specific information for finding aids. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2011]
Prerequisites
LIS590PV Privacy in the Internet Age
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course will examine the notion of privacy in its historical context, and in relation to existing and projected information/communication technologies and institutional arrangements. Topics covered include the nature of "identity"; protecting personal data; technologies for personal identification, societal surveillance, and privacy enhancement; technologies for describing, monitoring, and controlling levels of privacy; changes in cultural, legal, and policy understandings of privacy and privacy rights; needs for and approaches to privacy protection in a variety of institutions and industries; security-privacy interactions and policy implications; and specific cases such as privacy implications of automated transportation systems, medical records, online behavior, Google Maps, information mining, trans-border data flow, credit card theft, etc. [First offered in Fall 2013 as a 490 section for both UG and Grad students. Now split into separate sections with a 390 section for UGs (PVT--Privacy and Technology) and this 590 section for graduate students, first offered Fall 2014.]
Prerequisites Open to graduate students campus-wide.
LIS590QM Qualitative Methods Research [Qualitative Methods in Research]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Survey of strategies of qualitative inquiry, considering methods of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and reporting data.
Prerequisites PhD student; other graduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.
LIS590RDA Introduction to RDA
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course will introduce the user to RDA: Resource Description & Access. Reviews the development of RDA, analyze the relationship of RDA to AACR2, compare RDA to the rise of Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC) policy in the decade-long absence of revision to descriptive cataloging codes, and evaluate the implications of RDA for library users, catalogers, and metadata specialists. Students will construct RDA metadata records for a variety of resources and examine the assortment of relationships RDA allows the cataloger to designate in the records. [First offered as LEEP 590RDL in Summer 2013]
Prerequisites LIS 507 or demonstrated prior cataloging experience
LIS590RDC Research Probs Data Curation [Research Problems in Data Curation]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description A graduate level introduction to research problems in the curation of research data. Data curation is the active and on-going management of data through its lifecycle of interest and usefulness to scholarship, science, and education. The course will examine a broad range of theoretical, conceptual, and practical problems in this emerging field, focusing on the growing emphasis on data management and sharing across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities, and the importance of e-research and data science for all types of research enterprises. The seminar will cover current research in information science, library science, and cognate fields and explore future research directions. Research areas to be addressed include data practices and needs of researchers; trends and obstacles to data sharing; cyberinfrastructure and data repository development; data representation, organization, preservation, and access; data integration and re-use; development of data management services; and the professionalization of data science and implications for education and workforce development. [First offered Fall 2012]
Prerequisites Doctoral student; other graduate students may enroll with consent of instructor
LIS590RGS Race Gender Sexuality Inf Prof [Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Information Professions]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course examines how issues of race, gender and sexuality are represented in the information professions and will study how race, gender and sexuality affect, and are affected by, information technologies. Socially constructed (mis)representations (or lack of representations) of race, gender and sexual identity will be critically examined in different settings as they intersect, overlap, and impact the information use, technology practices, and the design of information resources and services in the processes of creation, organization, and dissemination of information in library and information science and related fields.
Prerequisites
LIS590RM Records and Info Mgt [Records and Information Management]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Records and Information Management can generally be defined as the systematic control of information sources created in the course of daily business operations for the sake of compliance, preservation, and efficient use and often focuses on the theory and practices of surveying record types, creating records series and systematically employing records schedules for transfer of records to an archives or for their proper disposal. This course will survey the history and practice of records and information management in corporate, non-profit, government and education environments and consider issues related to the records life-cycle, the records continuum, the concept of document authenticity and the role this concept has played in the development of digital preservation standards. Will introduce systems and standards used for managing electronic records and documents. Upon successful completion students will have a firm grasp on the tenets of organizing and appraising records and information sources within a number of professional settings. [Elective for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [Revised description effective Summer 2010]
Prerequisites
LIS590RO Represent & Organiz Info Res [Representing and Organizing Information Resources]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Emphasizes concepts and methods of organizing information resources across different settings and systems, or within one particular setting. The course extends the basic conceptual foundation provided in LIS 501 by providing further reading, analysis, discussion, and practice related to one or several major traditions of information organization in different environments (e.g., libraries, museums, archives, Internet, and within a single organization).
Prerequisites LIS 501.
LIS590RV Reviewing Children's Lit [Reviewing Children's Literature]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Introduction to both the history and process of reviewing children's literature. A writing-intensive course designed to improve students' ability to produce concise, clearly structured reviews of children's and young adult literature. Also includes examination of the cultural context and implications of reviewing. 2 GR hours. [First offered Summer 2013]
Prerequisites LIS graduate student; graduate students from other departments need permission of instructor to enroll.
LIS590S HR Mgmt in Lib & Info Centers [Human Resource Management in Libraries and Information Centers]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course presents theoretical and practical issues in human resources management and their application to libraries and information centers. Areas covered include employee interviewing and selection, evaluation, discipline and termination of employees, decision-making and job satisfaction.
Prerequisites
LIS590SA Topics in Subject Access
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description An advanced topics seminar in subject access that covers a range of topics including aspects of the traditional bibliographic canon, Hjorland's philosophical challenges to universal subject access, ongoing discussions at the Library of Congress about Library of Congress Subject Headings, experimentations with hybrid folksonomic and taxonomic approaches, as well as case studies of how enhanced subject access can increase ROI in business and industry. Open to masters and doctoral students.
Prerequisites LIS 501 or consent of instructor
LIS590SDP Scientific Data Policy Seminar
Credit 4 credit hours
Description Survey of recent policy changes regarding scientific data, including archiving, repositories, legal encumbrances and access, the lifecycle of data, and strategies for reporting data.
Prerequisites
LIS590SF Social Computing
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This interdisciplinary course introduces students to fundamental theories, methods, technologies and applications of social computing. Students learn about this emerging discipline from two perspectives: First, basic principles of collective information production and processing, and methods for studying these principles. Topics include prediction markets, games with a purpose, open source software development, social media, social networks, information visualization, and online games. Second, socio-technical aspects of the design and usage of respective technologies. This includes participation, privacy and security. Students learn how to solve problems in social computing in a systematic and rigorous fashion. At the end of the course, students will be able to design, manage and execute social computing projects for scholarly and commercial use, and to critically assess work in this area. [First offered Fall 2012]
Skill No programming skills required
Prerequisites
LIS590SI Social Analysis of ICTs
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Social Informatics (SI) studies relationships between social systems and information/communication technologies (ICTs). The course teaches major SI concepts and how to apply them to analyze and solve practical SI problems. Key concepts include functional, symbolic, situational, media-centric, and social-process views of ICTs, and ICT dimensions of social power, social choice, social organization, social complexity, and social agency. Sample applications include explaining successes, failures, and specific qualities of ICTs in practice; design/implementation of ICTs in dynamic social settings; ICT policy and resource decisions; dilemmas of information privacy/security; information access in groups and society. (Note: Covers basic material for Field Exam in Social Informatics.) [New title and description in effect for Fall 2012]
Prerequisites Graduate students
LIS590SJ Social Justice Info Prof [Social Justice in the Information Professions]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description This course is intended to provide a historic and contemporary overview of social justice and advocacy work in librarianship during the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will be primarily focused on activities in the United States, though international movements and perspectives will be addressed. Topics include: library work during the Progressive Era; desegregation of libraries and professional associations; alternative media in libraries; recruitment and retention of library workers from traditionally underrepresented populations; library outreach; intellectual freedom; and emerging critical issues in the field. [Course description change Summer 2012]
Prerequisites Graduate student
LIS590SL Special Lib Administration [Special Library Administration]
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Provides a thorough introduction and orientation to the objectives, organization and operation of special libraries. An overall objective of this course is to prepare students to be able to achieve SLA competencies after graduation and working as information professionals. Emphasis will be on tools and skills that prepare students for the practical challenge of managing special libraries. [Elective for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections]
Prerequisites
LIS590SO Ref Svcs & Resources Children [References Services and Resources for Children]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description This course will explore print and online reference resources and library services in the areas of ready reference, research, and reader's advisory for children to 14 years. Emphasis will be placed on the respective roles of public and school librarians, and on the balance between providing children with requested information and guiding them toward greater independence in information seeking. [First offered Summer 2012] [Title change from Info Sources & Svcs Children beginning with Summer 2014 offering]
Prerequisites
LIS590SP Coll Dev for Spec Colls [Collection Development for Special Collections]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Focuses on the issues and practices related to collection development for special collections libraries. The selection and acquisition of printed, manuscript, and digital materials for special collections libraries is a large subject, but it is a subject that is treated only sparsely in the professional literature. Students will gain an understanding of the nature and makeup of a collection in a rare books and manuscripts library, as well as an overview of the practices and procedures used by acquisitions librarians and development officers involved in the purchase or solicitation of materials for the collection. Attention will also be paid to the legal and ethical considerations that arise in making collection decisions in a special collections library. [Elective course for Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Fall 2010]
Prerequisites
LIS590SPM From Script to Print: Medieval [...: The Transformation of Medieval Culture, c.1350-c.1550]
Credit 2 GR hours [Elective for GSLIS Certificate in Special Collections]
Description Between the Black Death and the Break with Rome the cultural life of Western Europe was transformed. Even before moveable metal type came out of the Rhineland, old orthodoxies had been unsettled by novel scholarship, fervent classicism and vigorous, vernacular polemic carried in manuscript to a widening constituency of consumers. Print cemented these novelties and created a responsive reading public. It was this engaged, social community of readers that ensured renewed calls for reform around 1517 were not to be stifled and which became the focus of princely and pontifical efforts to confessionalize the continent. These remarkable changes might be studied by means of particular authors, texts or indeed the more dominant ideas but this course will focus on arguably the most powerful agents, the books themselves. In each seminar, an original book from the period will act as a point-of-entry into the key developments, and their effects for the people of Europe. Class presentation and a 20-page seminar paper for submission at the close of the eight-week course. [Meets w/MDVL 501A. Medieval Studies is lead dept.] [First offered Fall 2013]
Prerequisites Graduate student
LIS590SR Ref Sources for Rare Books [Reference Sources for Rare Books]
Credit 2 GR hours
Description An introduction to the vast body of reference literature used in cataloguing and reference work in special collections libraries and the antiquarian book trade. Emphasis will be given to major bibliographies, catalogues, and other reference works in the fields of early printed books, British and American literature, historical Americana, voyages and travels, science and medicine, maps and atlases, the book arts, and the antiquarian book trade and auction market. The course is intended for those who have not yet had a systematic introduction to the reference literature of rare books, as well as others who would like to refresh or update their knowledge of the reference works in these fields. The course will cover approximately three to four hundred printed and electronic sources. The instructor will discuss the background of each source, as well as its strengths and weaknesses. [Elective course for the Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590SS Identifier Semantics
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description Identifiers for such things as cultural objects, natural objects, persons, places and times, institutions, events, processes, data and datasets, substances, and even properties and mathematical values, play a fundamental role in information systems, and particularly in emerging areas such as contemporary metadata languages, ontologies, and "linked data". However exactly how identifiers identify remains very poorly understood. We review research on the semantics of referring expressions and explore applications of this work to URIs (Universal Resource Identifiers), identifiers that provide not only the foundation for the World Wide Web, but are fundamental to the knowledge representation languages RDF and OWL. Authors of particular focus include Frege, Russell, Searle, Kripke, Donnellan, Putnam, Evans, and Soames, as well as current research on problems with the use of URIs in RDF and OWL. [First offered Spring 2011]
Prerequisites Basic working knowledge of predicate logic required; some familiarity with modal notions and semantic technologies recommended. Undergraduates should have relevant background in linguistics, philosophy, or computer science.
LIS590ST Strategic Info Management [Strategic Information Management]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Overview of contemporary practices for managing information as a strategic asset of public-sector, non-governmental organizations, community-based and civil society service-based organizations including libraries and museums. Course examines the challenges of managing the information assets of organizations, methods for building the information capabilities of organizations, understanding the information infrastructure, strategies to assure reliable and secure IT services, managing information asset outsourcing, and how best to organize and lead the IT function. Students will learn through active learning how management, technology and organization components work together to create information systems, the behavioral aspects of using information assets in organizations, managerial usage of information systems; and, how to assess the information architecture and capabilities of an organization, and practices for developing strategic information plans. [A recommended course for the Community Informatics specialization.] [First offered Fall 2008]
Prerequisites
LIS590TC Thesaurus Construction
Credit 2 or 4 GR hours
Description The practice and underlying theories of thesaurus construction for information retrieval. The objectives of the course are for the student to: understand how thesauri for information retrieval are constructed according to national and international standards; critically analyze and revise existing thesauri following basic principles; review other access vocabularies besides thesauri which are needed for improved information retrieval; understand how free and controlled access to information can complement each other or indexing and searching; understand complications to thesaurus construction and use in an environment where there may be multiple thesauri, multilingual collections and users, or special formatted materials. Students enrolled for 4 credit hours will construct a thesaurus from scratch, following procedures and practices outlined in textbooks.
Prerequisites
LIS590THA Theories of Information A [formerly 590 TH]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course focuses on three important theories of information: 1) semantic information theory (Dretske's adaptation of Shannon); 2) situation semantics (Barwise and Perry); and 3) classical realism (the platonism of, e.g., Frege, Church, and Chisholm, combined with the social pragmatics of Grice and Searle). We will note potential applications of these theories to the development of foundations for data curation, digital preservation, information seeking, and informatics support for science and scholarship, and to related discussions within LIS (Buckland, Bates, Hjorland, Frohmann). [First offered Spring 2009 as 590TH]
Prerequisites Some familiarity with elementary predicate logic is expected. This course will be conducted as an advanced seminar.
LIS590THB Theories of Information B
Credit 4 GR hours
Description [Companion to 590THA] Covers additional theories of information and representation, including 1) probabilistic/statistical models; 2) dynamic, emergent, and evolutionary models; and 2) collective and contextual theories of information (e.g., Goguen). Special focus on the "meaning from form" issue and dynamic transitions from material to informational objects. Applications of the theories covered in the analysis/solution of substantive problems information science and bioinformatics. [First offered Spring 2010]
Prerequisites Some familiarity with elementary predicate logic is expected.
LIS590TI Telegraph To Internet [Telegraph to Internet: The Structure And Policy of Network Infrastructures]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course focuses on the historical analysis of a vital producer and consumer service: telecommunications networks. Successive generations of networking technology are studied in light of social conflict; over their institutional purposes; and shifts in industry structures and public policy are set within the larger and longer-term historical movement of American society. [First offered Spring 2006]
Prerequisites
LIS590TL Theological Librarianship
Credit 2 or 4 hours
Description Provides an overview of the contexts, materials, services, and issues characterizing theological librarianship. Course activities include readings, online discussions, writing assignments, and a weekly two-hour live session. Students interact with a number of librarians currently working in the field. Students enrolled for 4 hours complete an additional term project. [First offered Fall 2005. 590TL rubric discontinued after Spring 2013; now LIS 568 LE.]
Prerequisites Departmental permission required to enroll.
LIS590TR Info Transfer & Collab in Sci [Information Transfer and Collaboration in Science]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This seminar examines the role of information in the production of scientific knowledge. Building on a foundation of classic readings in the history and sociology of science, the course will cover a range of contemporary research on scientific communication, collaboration, research practice, and informatics. The focus is on formal and informal information transfer and communication as a social phenomenon and implications for collaborative science and e-science. The course had been developed as part of the master's degree in bioinformatics and is also suited for doctoral students and advanced master's students interested in professional development as science and medical information specialists. [First offered Fall 2006]
Prerequisites
LIS590TX Text Mining
Credit 4 GR hours
Description This course introduces students to the knowledge discovery process and methods used to mine patterns from a collection of text. We will critically review text mining methods developed in the knowledge discovery and databases, information science, and computational linguistics communities. Students will develop proficiency with modeling text through individual projects. [First offered Spring 2010]
Prerequisites An introductory level database and programming course or permission of the instructor.
LIS590UMI Understand Multimedia Info [Understanding Multimedia Information: Concepts and Practices]
Credit 4 GR hours
Description Designed for those with an interest exploiting multimedia information in web and electronic publishing projects, students will be introduced to the theory behind, and the tools associated with, a wide variety of audio (e.g., MP3, WAV, WM9, RealAudio), graphic (JPEG, GIF, PNG, etc.), music (MIDI, GUIDO, etc.) and text information formats (e.g., PS, PDF, etc.). After completing this course students should be empowered to make intelligent choices in selecting appropriate multimedia formats to match particular design requirements. A mix of lectures, demos and hands-on work. Students should have access to a personal computer upon which they can experiment on their own with downloaded multimedia software tools. SKILLS: Students must be competent in basic computing including the installation and configuration of software packages. Must understand basic HTML and simple web site construction tools (e.g., FTP, text editing, etc.). [Elective course for the CAS in Digital Libraries concentration] [First offered Spring 2008]
Skill See Description.
Prerequisites
LIS590X A course with an "X--" section identifier is a WISE course.
Credit varies
Description WISE Consortium: http://www.wiseeducation.org/default.aspx
Prerequisites Departmental approval.
LIS590X01 Data Adm Concepts and DB Mgt [Data Administration Concepts and Database Management]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 659] Definition, development, and management of databases for information systems. Data analysis techniques, data modeling, and schema design. Query languages and search specifications. Overview of file organization for databases. Data administration concepts and skills. Requires Windows XP Professional, MS access and MS Visio. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X02 Info Industry Strategies [Information Industry Strategies]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 775] Issues in converging information industry sectors such as hardware, software, telecommunications, information services, and content. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X03 Managing Info Systems Projs [Managing Information Systems Projects]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 645] Covers the issues necessary for successful management of information systems projects. Technical and behavioral aspects of project management are discussed. Major topics include managing the project adoption issues such as selection and approval of projects and requirements analysis; planning for systems development and estimation; scheduling and implementation issues such as project organization, implementation, and control; project closure. Course objectives are 1) to enable students to understand issues in the management or development of real-world information and telecommunications systems, and 2) to develop project management skills and experience that will be transferable to students' professional lives.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X04 Electronic Commerce
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 642] Companies and customers are discovering the potential impact of the Internet and the Web as powerful strategic assets. Businesses are reengineering their processes to respond to the increased demand for the efficient collection and dissemination of information. This course explores business concepts, opportunities, challenges and strategies related to electronic commerce. Electronic commerce (EC) is the use of information technology in conducting economic transactions and managing businesses over computer networks. Starting with an introduction to electronic commerce, it examines the new opportunities and threats that are appearing online. Different business models in the electronic environment will be discussed. It will also cover the ways organizations are building relationships with customers as well as serving them. In sum, this course will attempt to relate EC strategies to a firm's strategic information management and analyze the organizational fit between strategy and technology from a business perspective. To reach these goals, we will engage in case discussions that address recent real world examples.
Skill Uses an interactive teaching method, which requires extensive preparation, participation, and involvement from the students.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X05 Plan Design Digital Lib Svcs [Planning and Designing Digital Library Services]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 759] Development, design and planning of digital library services. The course provides intensive hands-on instruction on Internet information services and their building and management, for students of mixed technical capabilities. [NOT OFFERED AS OF SUMMER 2006]
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X06 Creat Manag Presrv Dig Assets [Creating, Managing and Preserving Digital Assets]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 677] Issues and trends in transferring analog and paper-based collections (including manuscripts, photographs, videos, and films) into digital collections. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X07 Technology Issues in Archives
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee L&I SCI 891] This course explores technology issues facing archivists today, addressing technology and its uses in collection management, arrangement and description, reference, digitization, and electronic records. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X08 Managing Acad Info Enterprise [Managing the Academic Information Enterprise]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Maryland LBSC 708K / INFM 718C] Using the college/university environment as an example, the purpose of this course is to identify the many information resources needed to support each of these areas, to review existing organizational structures developed to manage these resources, and within this review to examine the role of the CIO. Students will identify and explore management issues within the context of the academic enterprise. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites Basic management course [e.g., LIS 505]. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X09 Poetry for Children and YAs [Poetry for Children and Young Adults]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:611:545] This course is designed to assist teachers and librarians in selecting, evaluating, and encouraging the informed enjoyment of poetry written for children and young adults in the twentieth century. The semester will cover a variety of poetic forms, including ballads, haiku, and lyrics, a comparison of anthologies published in the past three decades, African-American poetry, the children's poetry by noted poets such as Richard Wilbur, Randall Jarell, Theodore Roethke and Robert Graves, among other aspects of poetry. Assignments will include readings, developing lesson plans and/or web pages to support poetry in the curriculum, illustrating a poem and significant participation in a web-based discussion. While the coursework will not privilege any specific ideological/critical methodology, it will teach and require familiarity with a broad vocabulary of basic terms and poetic devices. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X10 Marketing and PR for Libraries [Marketing and Public Relations for Libraries]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Pittsburgh LIS 2830] In this time of decreased funding, information professionals need to become highly visible in order to compete for their market share and available funds. Information managers will be called upon to generate revenue and effectively market their product. This course will introduce LIS students to the variety of marketing techniques that are employed in all types of successful organizations. It will also teach students how to conduct a community analysis to determine the needs of the potential users and to develop a marketing plan for their organization. Students will be able to tailor the projects to their individual specialization (public, academic, special, archives, school). Other issues will include public relations, customer service, and development. Online asynchronous delivery. May also include an optional on-campus meeting in Pittsburgh.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X11 Designing the PL of the Future [WISE Libraries: Designing the Public Library of the Future]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 600] This online course seeks to provide students with the knowledge, resources, and skills to participate in the design of a public library. It will foster new connections between schools and encourage the sharing of ideas by including two or three students from each of the WISE members. Students will explore the future of public libraries and librarianship through readings from a variety of disciplines, collaborative assignments, and hands-on design exercises. They will attempt to answer the questions: * What will make up the information world of 2030? * What does the future hold for the public library? * What is the public library of 2030 going to look like? Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X12 Fairy Tales as Literature [Does the Shoe Fit? Fairy Tales as Literature for Children]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 611:561] In this course we will look deeply at the complications and complexities of fairy tales. Among other things we will examine the definitions, histories, and variations of fairy tales. Additionally, we will investigate how fairy tales have been used to instruct and entertain children. Finally, we will consider how children's literature creators interpret and re-interpret fairy tales. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X13 Archival Outreach: Prog & Svcs [Archival Outreach: Programs and Services]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee L&I SCI 752] An introduction to archival outreach and reference services for sustaining an archival program committed to public service. [Online asynchronous delivery]
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X14 Feminism, Libnship & Info [Feminism, Librarianship and Information]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee L&I SCI 891] Examines the nature of librarianship as a profession, issues related to information, and practices of information services from gendered perspectives using applicable feminist theoretical interpretations. OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of the course a student will better understand the gendered construction: 1) of librarianship as a profession, 2) of the philosophy and practices of library and information work, and 3) of information as a global entity. S/he will also be able to apply feminist theoretical concepts to information use and service. Online asynchronous delivery.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X15 Publishing for the Profession [Seminar in Contemporary Issues:Publishing for the Profession]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description (A WISE course.)The health of any profession depends on the vigorous exchange of news, knowledge, and ideas, and today the field of library and information science (LIS) is especially vibrant. Libraries and their services are evolving, adapting to new technologies and user needs. Information issues are reaching across disciplines and communities and touching people everywhere, inside and outside the library. By writing about library and information subjects, we can support our profession and reach out to our communities. We can share, inform, and advocate. There's plenty to write about and plenty of publishing venues, in print and online. In fact, there are more professional publishing opportunities available to us today than ever before: professional journals & newsletters, weblogs & discussion lists, magazines & newspapers. To maintain the richness and relevancy of their content, many of these publications depend on the work of authors, editors, reviewers, other contributors. If you like to write and have something to say about LIS, this is a great time to start developing your ideas, sharing your work, and building your own portfolio of publications.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X16 Child Lit Goes to the Movies [Children's Literature Goes to the Movies]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:611:581] Examines the interpretive structures of American children's movies based on children's literature: how literal fidelity relates to creative license (i.e., adaptation versus translation); how evolving understandings of race, gender, ethnicity and age affect filmic interpretation and presentation; if a book's theme or core narrative can be divided from the cultural, ideological and political influences that constitute its identity; how successful children's films of the past impose upon the presentation of new works; does knowledge of the original book enrich the experience of going to the movie (and does the movie enrich one's understanding of the original book), or are movie and book are essentially separate. Films we will study will include: The Little Mermaid, Snow White, Cinderella, Aladdin, Pinocchio, I Am the Cheese, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Matilda, Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, The Fellowship of the Ring, Jumani, Shrek, several versions of Little Women. Students will be required to read the literature and view the films (readily available from popular video outlets).
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X17 Globalization & Info Society [Globalization & the Info Society: Info, Communication & Development]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse IST 600] An advanced graduate seminar, which is an initiative of the Collaboratory on Technology Enhanced Learning Communities (http://cotelco.syr.edu) at Syracuse SIS. Currently involves participants registered at universities in the United States, South Africa, and around the world. The approach to the seminar is to use synchronous and asynchronous learning techniques to break the boundaries of space, time and distance. Using a geographically-distributed computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) pedagogical model, the seminar employs a suite of web-based tools to create a highly interactive, globally networked collaborative learning environment. Within this learning environment, seminar participants explore the socio-economic, political and cultural implications of globalization and the on-going development of a knowledge-based Information Society. The seminar takes a global multi-stakeholder approach, with particular emphasis on the responses to these issues from the perspectives of Africa, the developing world, and the civil society sector.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X18 Info Svcs for Specific Pops [Information Services for Specific Populations]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill INLS 739] Service, professional, and administrative issues related to information access by nontraditional information service users; the course examines trends, public policy, ethical issues, programming, and evaluation of services.
Prerequisites Completion of a basic reference course. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X19 Building Literate Communities [Building Literate Communities in the 21st Century]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse IST 600] This course examines the critical need for and process through which key community institutions, such as libraries, can collaborate to build communities in which all adults and families have basic literacy or English-language skills. Libraries, businesses, schools, cultural institutions, community-based organizations, churches, and health-service providers all have a stake in the development of literate families, workers, and community members. Understanding the challenge of limited literacy and the strength of collaborative work will help librarians be effective community partners and effective service providers. The course will emphasize practical application of content in library settings.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X20 Information Visualization Pitt
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Pittsburgh LIS 2690] This course focuses on the visual design, structure, and organization of information as applied to library and information environments and web site design. Topics include visualization literacy, usability research, theories of visual perception and cognition, visualization models, visual analytics, and data graphics. The emphasis is on user and task-centered design for developing and evaluating visualization-based tools for various types of data. Practical work with visualization technologies will be included.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X21 Info in an Aging World [Information Resources, Services and Technology in an Aging World]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Pittsburgh LIS 2970] This course will focus on collection development, reference, and education services for older adults, and their professional and family caregivers. The course will cover the critical evaluation of materials in print, non-print, and electronic formats, and a discussion of information services provided by healthcare organizations, community agencies, medical center and hospital libraries, public libraries which serve an aging population, and academic libraries serving students in the helping professions. This course is especially appropriate for those interested in working in medical and public libraries, healthcare organizations, community agencies, and academic libraries which students intending careers in the helping or service professions, especially in fields that focus on older people.
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X22 Int'l Issues & Innovations [International Issues and Innovations]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of British Columbia LIBR 562] The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of library development and services throughout the world. Students will learn the issues and problems facing the development of libraries within their socio-economic and cultural contexts and will become acquainted with the successes and/or failures of various approaches to these issues. As North American librarianship is addressed in other SLAIS courses, most attention will be given to library development in other regions.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X23 Books & Boys in the School Yrs [Man of Advantage: Books & Boys in the Middle and High School Years]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:610:591] Mark Twain famously said that "the man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them." In this course we will consider the reading interests of boys and young men aged ten to eighteen, develop criteria for evaluating books for this audience, and explore the challenges unique to maintaining their interests in literature. We will examine the voices of boys and men who have told their own stories and consider books of particular interest to middle and high school males. This course is a seminar; there will be heavy emphasis on reading and discussions.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X24 Museum Archives
Credit 3 GR hours [a WISE course]
Description [University of Pittsburgh LIS 2225] Overview of the evolution of the purposes of museums; history and development of museum record keeping systems, with particular emphasis on changes in those systems in transition from paper-based to electronic records, use of functional analysis to identify principle functions of museums and to guide the appraisal of records that document those functions.
Prerequisites Departmental approval.
LIS590X25 Seminar in Recs Mgmt Genealogy [Seminar in Archives and Records Management: Genealogy]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 284] In-depth study of current issues and practices in providing library reference services to genealogists. The course addresses reference tools, collection development, community and referral sources, Internet usage and information seeking behavior of patrons conducting genealogical and biographical research.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X26 From Seuss to Sendak to Sis
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:611:544] This course will study the development of children's book illustration in the work of three masters of the twentieth century. You will explore the picture books of Dr. Seuss, Maurice Sendak, and Peter Sis, considering issues such as the use of history made by each illustrator and his concern for social context, the relationship of image to text and of illustration to a linear narrative, and repeating motifs and symbols that join individual publications into an organic whole. Students in the course will be divided into groups which will explore the three illustrators; this exploration will include a look at work by other important 20th century contemporaries such as Hillary Knight, Mitsumasa Anno, and Quentin Blake. The final weeks of the semester will be a conference period during which the groups will share some of the papers they have written and together discover how different perceptions, research, and group dynamics led to alternate hypotheses about these three masters.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X27 Contemporary Academic Libnship [Contemporary Academic Librarianship]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 600] This course examines 21st century academic libraries (community college, college and university) within the context of higher education, scholarly communication and the world of contemporary publishing including issues related to the library's social, political and legislative environments; managerial and administrative principles and practices including staff organization and supervision, fiscal and legal responsibilities, clientele/constituents, typical and unique services (ex. social networking, information literacy) and collections, physical and virtual settings, marketing and public relations; leadership; advocacy (within higher education and external to the organization); information technology; operational and strategic planning; evaluation and assessment; managing change; community, collaboration and partnerships; and, current issues (ex. development, the competitive academy) and future trends in academic libraries.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X28 Svcs to Diverse Communities [Services to Racially and Ethically Diverse Communities]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 275] This course focuses on developing skills for planning, implementing, and evaluating programs and services for addressing the information needs of racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse communities. Reviews the major national, state, and local studies.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X29 The Voice of the Author
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:611:582] In this graduate seminar you will read works by and about a half dozen children's authors, paying special attention to the authors' own statements about the creative process. We will consider the work of authors including Cynthia Leitich Smith, Chris Crutcher, and Julius Lester, among others. During the semester, authors Smith, Crutcher, and Lester will enter the online discussion with the class for one week each. Sessions: this course is offered online asynchronously.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X30 GLBTIQ Resources & Services
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 220--Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, and Queer/Questioning (GLBTIQ) Resources and Services] This class will explore library services and resources as they relate to GLBTIQ (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, and Queer/Questioning) communities and their support systems. We will discuss various library operations and services within the context of LGBTIQ issues and concerns as well as examine and evaluate key publications and other information resources in the field.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval. Basic classes in information retrieval, management, and reference
LIS590X31 Politics, Power, and Prize.
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers] Focuses on the modern phenomenon of book awards for Children's Literature. Though Children's Literature has struggled to be perceived as a legitimate field of literary scholarship, this course will show-in the history and context of American Literature-how Children's Literature has historically honored or marginalized various kinds of published works. Will observe Children's Literature's critical awareness of this marginalization and follow newly founded awards established to honor multiculturalism. Analyzes the universal appreciation of Children's Literature expressed by all the award foundations and the intertextual nature of award-winning Children's Literature and look at the powerful politics of the award. Throughout the course, students will not only develop critical skills for reading, thinking, and writing about Children's Literature and culture in America, but also create connections to the context of international literature and culture. To foster these goals, assignments will include writing analytical papers, participation in class discussions, projects, and presentations.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X32 Archivists--Meet Web 2.0 [Seminar in Archives and Records Management: Archivists--Meet Web 2.0]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University LIBR 284] Web 2.0 is here. Organizations and individuals can-and do-create, share and store information in a variety of web-hosted packages: Google docs, blogs, wikis, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, and more. What does Web 2.0 mean for archivists and how should the profession respond? Take this course to explore the opportunities and challenges presented by the increasing use of online technologies within organizations and society and to consider the implications for archival theory and practice. By the end of this course, you will be able to: 1) Describe a variety of Web 2.0 technologies that may be employed by organizations and individuals, 2) Analyze, assess, and embrace the opportunities and challenges presented by Web 2.0 technologies, 3) Describe the impact the use of such technologies on archival theory and practice, and 4) Develop a case study of an archival institution that has come to embrace the opportunities and challenges presented by Web 2.0 technologies.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X34 Female Historical Narratives [Female Voices in Historical Narratives]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:611:543] From picture books to teen novels, from history to folktale, this course will examine the voices of women and girls as they tell their own stories and as stories are told about them. We will work from a list of titles, most published within the past five years, and will read and discuss some of them together and some of them as individual projects. The emphasis in the course will be on reading widely and on intense engagement with the texts. Students will have the opportunity to create book lists, booktalks, and/or Web pages to explore their interpretations of this literature.
Prerequisites Experience in a children's literature course strongly recommended. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X35 Knowledge Management
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Simmons College LIS 465] This course introduces information professionals to the basics underlying the KM function--the organization and dissemination of the information that an organization already owns. Seventy-five percent of the course will address KM from a management perspective and the remainder will introduce the document management issues that the elective courses listed below will further develop. Various aspects of managing KM will be covered such as its link to organizational strategy, costs, benefits, standards, and professionals' roles. Also, operational components will be introduced, including taxonomies, thesauri, indexes, and the retrieval of textual information. Case studies are included.
Prerequisites Completion of a basic reference course. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X36 Intell Property Search on Web [Res & Info Svcs: Patents & Intellectual Prop Searching on Internet]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 220] The course covers intellectual property searching in all types of libraries and information centers. Special emphasis will be given to U.S. patent and trademark information, publications and databases, their organization, use in libraries and methods of searching including by inventor, owner, and subject of invention. International patents and trademarks will also be covered, particularly as they relate to U.S. intellectual property. Copyright, trade secret, and other areas of intellectual property will be covered as they relate to our main topic: patents and trademarks.
Prerequisites Completion of a basic reference course. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X37 Oral History Records Mgmt [Seminar in Archives and Records Management: Oral History]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 284] This course covers the theory and practice of oral history as a means to expand and enhance the historical record. The class will focus on the design and implementation of an oral history project as well as archival issues relating to the preservation and management of oral history collections. Students will conduct an oral history interview and learn the basic procedures of processing, preserving, and making available oral history tapes, digital files, and transcripts. Course Prerequisites: Basic courses in 1) introduction to the information profession, 2) information retrieval, and 3) management.
Prerequisites Completion of a basic reference course. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X38 GLBTQ Lit for Young Adults [GLBTQ Literature for Young Adults]
Credit 1 GR hour
Description [A WISE course. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 691] An examination of young adult literature which addresses the issues of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning teens and families. Eight to ten current titles will be read and discussed, and students will also learn techniques for reading guidance, publicity and collection development.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X39 Encoded Archival Description (EAD)
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 284] Covers in-depth Encoded Archival Description (EAD), and provides an introduction to Encoded Archival Context (EAC). At the completion of this class students should be able to: Explain the origins of SGML/XML, the concept of a Document Type Definition (DTD) and XML schema; Explain the concept of text markup and how it enables text to be viewed on the Web, along with basic client-server concepts; Explain the history of EAD/EAC, their development, relationships to other archival descriptive standards such as ISAD(G), ISAAR-CPF, and DACS, & significance for the archival community; Identify the structure of the EAD DTD and EAC schema, their element composition and other aspects, and how those elements relate to the individual components of an archival collection guide and descriptions of records creators; Identify tools developed to aid in the encoding process; Identify consortia and individual institutions that have utilized EAD/EAC to markup and post their collection guides and authority records online; Markup a simple finding aid and authority record for viewing on the Web. [Updated description effective Spring 2013]
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X40 Copyright Law in Digital Age [Copyright Law in the Digital Age]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 600] Once a legal backwater that interested only specialists and attorneys, copyright law issues are now considered central to the nation's information infrastructure. With the advent of digital technologies, copyright law has become more complex than ever, as longstanding rules and concepts have now been questioned amidst the advent of TiVo, Napster, Kazaa, and the DVD. This course is designed to provide information professionals with a firm foundation in the fundamental rules of American copyright law, and will equip such professionals with the tools to make informed decisions about copyright issues that occur in the workplace. While the course is optimized for librarians and library science candidates, its content is relevant for information professionals working in any field.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X41 Adv Info Tech Tools: Web 2.0 [Advanced Information Technology Tools: Web 2.0]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 246] Focused on developing the skills and knowledge necessary to evaluate, implement and maintain social software tools. Examines the social technologies that define Web 2.0 and how libraries can capitalize on these tools to improve communication between the library and its patrons, build online communities, and better share information professionally. This course will focus on social software best practices, highlighting successful examples and discovering what makes them so effective. Will involve a significant amount of hands-on experience with the technologies as well as frequent reflections on how to apply what you've learned in a professional setting with opportunity to explore social software from an academic standpoint and a practical standpoint; understanding how communities form through these tools and how you can capitalize on them in a library setting.
Prerequisites Information Retrieval course. WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X42 Music Cataloging
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. UW-Milwaukee L&I Sci 791] Detailed examination of the bibliographic control of music materials (scores, sound recordings, videorecordings) and their inherent bibliographic characteristics. Special problems in the application of standard methods for descriptive cataloging, authority control, subject analysis and classification of music materials. Structure of music catalogs and requirements for the effective retrieval of music materials.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X43 Myth & Legend in Child Lit [In Search of Cupid & Psyche: Myth and Legend in Children's Literature]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Rutgers University 17:611] In this course you will learn to analyze children's books that borrow heavily from myths and archaic legend, and to recognize and describe mythological elements within a broad range of books for children and young adults. You will learn to recognize mythic elements in text and illustrations, discover commonalities among culturally diverse literatures, and explore how contemporary myths operate in specific literary works. Prerequisites: experience in a children's literature course is strongly recommended; experience using email and basic World Wide Web searching techniques, your own reliable Internet account, and the hardware and software required for an online course.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X44 Digital Copyright [Seminar in Contemporary Issues: Digital Copyright]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 281] Examines digital copyright by giving students a legal and policy framework to evaluate the myriad of copyright scenarios facing libraries today. Copyright issues permeate the library's digital environment, from web site design to book scanning projects to online reference. To participate in the active debate about fair use, digital rights management systems, e-reserve systems and the like, librarians need to be well versed in both the basics of copyright law and the latest developments by regulation, legislation and court decisions.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X45 Gender Culture Child Pict Bks [Gender and Culture in Children's Picture Books]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [Rutgers University 17:611:584] In this course you will work online to develop an understanding of: criteria for evaluating children's picture books for their cultural authenticity; different illustrative techniques and their effectiveness for particular texts; problems of translating children's books from one language and culture to another; and the variety of materials available and publishing trends in multiculturalism. Coursework will emphasize books that use powerful verbal and visual images to promote self esteem and cultural awareness among young children. You will participate in online discussions with your colleagues in the course and with various experts in other parts of this country and abroad.
Prerequisites Departmental approval
LIS590X46 New Directions in Public Libs [New Directions in Public Libraries]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 600 M800] Present state and future prospects of public libraries in light of changes in the technology of communications.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X47 Cultural Heritage
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Pittsburgh LIS 2970] This course is designed to educate students on the vital role that archives and records play in cultural heritage fields. Examines the application of various archival theories and practices in cultural heritage, cultivates a better appreciation of cultural groups represented by the cultural heritage industries, and analyzes the various ethical stances surrounding their cultural property, cultural traditions, art, and other memory devices and institutions.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental Approval
LIS590X48 Multicultural Children's Lit [Multicultural Children's Literature]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee L&I Sci 691, sect. 203] An exploration of the children's literature representing racialized groups in the United States. Discussion will focus on evaluating and selecting material using critical race theory.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X49 Materials for Tweens
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 264] Survey of materials in various formats including fiction, nonfiction, movies, music, and digital materials and how they meet the developmental needs of this age group. Collection development tools and techniques will also be included.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X50 Tech in Lives of Child & YAs [Technology in the Lives of Children and Young Adults]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Pittsburgh LIS 2633] As digital media becomes more embedded in the collections and services that libraries offer young people, information professionals must consider the issues in order to deliver the best service possible. How do children use these technologies? How does technology affect the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development of young people? Is all technology good? How do we help young people use it in meaningful and socially responsible ways? The goals of this course are for students to be able to discuss in a critical manner the key issues surrounding technology in the lives of children and youth and apply new technologies (virtual reality, mobile technology, computer games, smart toys) to library services and programming for young people. Students plan a program for ALA's Teen Tech Week and create a digital storytelling project.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X51 Info Svcs Special Needs Pops [Information Services for Special Needs Populations]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Texas at Austin INF 385] Examines the historical and philosophical context of the concept of disability, including ADA regulation, mainstreaming, and deinstitutionalization. Considers the ramifications of current thinking for libraries and other information providers. Explores the practicalities of equal provision of service to populations designated as special needs.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X52 Pub Libs: Phil Policy Politics [Public Libraries: Philosophy, Policy, Politics]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. UW-Milwaukee L&I SCI 891-202] Designed as an online research seminar focused on the modern American/Canadian public library. Core readings investigate three aspects of public librarianship: the philosophy that impacts public and practitioner perceptions of public libraries; the political position of public libraries, often related to those philosophical foundations; how policies, drafted in response to the philosophy, are implemented to deliver public library services. Students demonstrate their engagement with this framework by developing a case study investigating a particular implementation of one of these policies / practices in an actual library. Topics have included such elements as the impact of participation in a public library system on a single rural library(WI); the role of policy in addressing public emergencies (IA); the impact of intentional outreach models on the delivery of public services (MN); tax policy and its impact on library construction (WI). The research method is the case study. Online participation in discussions is highly valued in the course. [Updated description effective Spring 2013]
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X53 RDF, Ontologies & Semantic Web [RDF, Ontologies and the Semantic Web]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee L&I Sci 719, sect. 213] Introduction to Semantic Web concepts and applications, focusing on the Resource Description Framework (RDF), RDF Schema, Ontologies, and Web Ontonoly Language (OWL).
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental Approval
LIS590X54 Social Networking in Libraries
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University, IST 600, sect. M801] This course will introduce you to the uses of social networking, and then connect the capabilities and concepts of social networking to the work of librarians. The emphasis of the course is how practical understanding and use of social networking sites and social media sites tie into larger concepts of librarianship including service development, outreach, access and marketing. The course will show practical skills tied to deeper concepts of librarianship, participation, and conversation.
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval
LIS590X56 Social Media for Info Prof'ls [Social Media for Information Professionals]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Univ of British Columbia LIBR 559M] This course interrogates social media (i.e. blogs, tagging, wikis, social networking), its affordances and co-relation to web 2.0 and library 2.0. The course explores the effective use as well as management of social technologies in order to address information problems in library and information (LIS) organizations. On completion of the course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss social media as a set of digital tools to raise awareness and promote services 2. Demonstrate familiarity with the range of social media used by LIS organizations 3. Apply social media to the management of emerging challenges in service delivery 4. Reflect critically on the use of social tools and identify strategies for their effective implementation 5. Identify areas for future social media research for LIS professionals. [First offered Spring 2013]
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X57 Organizational/Info Ethics [Organizational/Information Ethics]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Simmons College LIS 475] The course will examine the ethical implications of decisions made within various organizational contexts regarding issues such as property ownership, strategy formulation, the utilization of computer technology, employee relations, accountability, conflicts of interest, as well as other topics relevant to today's managers. Participants will examine the ethical implications of cases at the individual, organizational, and societal levels. The course will assist professionals to clarify and apply their own moral standards and ethical norms, beliefs, and values to unfamiliar, complex situations in which the appropriate application of these values may not be obvious. The course makes no effort to dictate what is "right," "proper," and "just"; that is left to the individual's own moral standards of behavior and ethical systems of belief. [First offered Spring 2013]
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental approval.
LIS590X58 Grant Writing
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 282] This is a hands-on introductory course in grants and alternative funding resources for all libraries, with an emphasis on public libraries. Skills developed are applicable to other organizations as well. Students will work with a real library or other organization, assess library needs and future service development, create a marketing piece that outlines organizational mission and strengths, research current and potential funders, develop an actual grant or proposal for implementation, and determine funding and management priorities for alternative resource development. Students will become familiar with various types of funding resources for libraries and program development. [First offered Summer 2013]
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X59 The Hyperlinked Library [The Hyperlinked Library: Emerging Trends, Emerging Technologies]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 287] This course will examine various theories of library service, the advent of social networking tools, the creation of online collaboration and communities via those tools and their adoption by libraries as well as the rise of Library 2.0 thinking, a service philosophy born out of discussions of Web 2.0 and participatory library services. Students will experience an immersive learning environment via a wide range of tools. We will discuss the definition of participatory service, explore some key trends that impact the model, and examine what this shift means for libraries and information work in the 21st Century. (See expanded description on the syllabus.) In Fall 2013, the Hyperlinked Library course will be updated to include new assignments and new modules on emerging trends in libraries and information environments, such as "creation culture." #hyperlib students will also have a chance to interact with 400+ practitioners from all over the world participating in a separate MOOC version of The Hyperlinked Library course. [First offered Fall 2013]
Prerequisites WISE and Departmental Approval
LIS590X60 Health Consumer Resources Svcs [Health Consumer Resources and Services]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. LIS 2585, University of Pittsburgh]. Collection development, reference, and educational services in the domain of consumer-health resources in print, non-print, and electronic formats. Identification of appropriate and accurate resources for consumer health and family education; policy issues in providing consumer and family-health information in different settings; role of public media; and information and referral services to and from healthcare organizations, community agencies, and public libraries.
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X61 Distributed Learning Libnship [Distributed Learning Librarianship]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description A WISE course [LIS 5369, sect 005, University of North Texas]. The course examines the history of library support for distributed learning, open learning, correspondence courses, mailed courses, and the like. We discuss the current and future issues in public, school, and academic library support of distributed learning especially as it pertains to computer-assisted learning. We explore current developments in copyright law as it relates to distributed/online learning and how different libraries policies support, or do not support, distributed learning and practice virtual librarianship. The course is a reading and discussion forum with emphasis on student led inquiry and discussion. We investigate various resources and develop solutions to problems libraries face, and will face, in support of distributed learning. Several expert guests join our discussions.
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X62 User Experience
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 287]. User experience (UX) characterizes how a person feels about a product, system, or service. User experience and design thinking can be applied to all aspects of libraries: from everything in your physical buildings to your library's online presence. Librarians are the designers of the way users experience library services, resources, and programs. In this course, you will explore: -The relationship between design thinking, user experience, and innovation -Touchpoints found in library buildings -The user experience elements of library website -Usability techniques and website improvements -UX for the future of libraries Good design, in library buildings and online, goes much deeper than choosing colors; it requires learning about communities and meeting their needs. You'll gain a toolbox of UX techniques, including user interviews, surveys, focus groups, personas, customer journey maps, and contextual inquiries. With a sharper analytical eye and UX design skills, you'll be able to optimize, create, and innovate for current and future library users. [First offered Summer 2-14]
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X63 Managing Photographic Colls [Managing Photographic Collections]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 284]. This class will examine issues involving managing photographic collections in archives. Topics covered will include photographic process identification, visual literacy, arrangement and description, storage/preservation needs, access, reference, digitization, rights and reproductions, curation, and born-digital image archives.
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X64 Mobile Devices: Svcs and Apps [Mobile Devices: Services and Applications]
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. San Jose State University Libr 287] As more and more of our population embraces mobile technologies, including smartphones and tablets, they are expecting the services offered to them to follow that path. When you know more about what is possible with a mobile device (and what isn't), you are more empowered to successfully design and deliver services to your users that they may not have expected. In this course you will -learn about designing services for mobile platforms -explore the decision making process for designing mobile based services -learn the basics of developing web applications for use on multiple platform -learn about deploying mobile applications We will try to answer the following questions -What services lend themselves well to the mobile space and how can we deliver them? -What services do not work well in the mobile space? -What new services might be discovered and delivered through a mobile environment. This course assumes a basic knowledge of web technologies (HTML, CSS, etc) but that you may have never programmed an application before. While some programming experience may be helpful, it also assumes that any prior experience might not be in an object-oriented programming environment. The goal is to go from having little to no programming experience to being able to understand and navigate an integrated development environment and understand the requirements for deploying a mobile application on various platforms. [First offered Fall 2014]
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS590X65 Copyright for Information Prof
Credit 3 GR hours
Description [A WISE course. Syracuse University IST 735] Geared for library and information professionals, this course provides a firm foundation in the fundamental rules of American copyright law, and equips them with the tools to make informed decisions about copyright issues. [First offered Fall 2014]
Prerequisites WISE and departmental approval.
LIS591 Practicum
Credit 2 GR hours
Description Supervised field experience of professional-level duties in an approved library or information center. A maximum of 2 hours may be applied toward a degree program. Approved for S/U grading only.
Prerequisites Completion of 14 graduate hours of library and information science courses. Submission of Practicum Forms: http://www.lis.illinois.edu/academics/practicum/forms Enrollment CRN provided after submission of completed, signed form.
LIS592 Independent Study
Credit 2 to 4 GR hours. May be repeated by M.S. student to maximum of 4 hrs, C.A.S. to max of 8 hrs, Ph.D. to max of 16 hrs
Description Permits the intermediate or advanced student opportunity to undertake the study of a topic not otherwise offered in the curriculum or to pursue a topic beyond or in greater depth than is possible within the context of a regular course.
Prerequisites Submission of "Request to Enroll in LIS 592" form: http://webdocs.lis.illinois.edu/registration/592form.pdf . Enrollment CRN provided after submission of completed, signed form.
LIS593 CAS Project
Credit 0 to 8 hours.
Description Individual study of a problem in library or information science; forms the culmination of the Certificate of Advanced Study program. Only 8 hours will apply to the CAS degree.
Prerequisites Admission to Certificate of Advanced Study (CAS) program in LIS. Submission of "Request to Enroll in LIS 593" form: http://webdocs.lis.illinois.edu/registration/593form.pdf . Enrollment CRN will be provided after submission of completed, signed form.
LIS594 LIS Practice
Credit 0 hours
Description Full-time or part-time practice of library and information science in an off-campus library or information science environment. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Contact advising@support.lis.illinois.edu for further information.
Prerequisites LIS student
LIS599MS Thesis Research (Optional Master's thesis)
Credit 8 credit hours required for a completed Master's Thesis
Description Individual study and research for an optional Master's thesis.
Prerequisites MS students must submit a completed (including signatures) "Request to Enroll in LIS 599 - Master's Thesis" form: http://webdocs.lis.illinois.edu/registration/599form.pdf . Enrollment CRN provided after submission of completed, signed form.
LIS599PHD Thesis Research (Required Ph.D. dissertation)
Credit 32 credit hours required for a completed Ph.D. dissertation
Description Individual study and research for the Ph.D. dissertation.
Prerequisites


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