Graduate School of Library and Information Science - University of Illinois http://www.lis.illinois.edu/rss.xml en Center for Children's Books Annual Open House & Galley Giveaway http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/09/17/center-childrens-books-annual-open-house-galley-giveaway <p>We invite you to join us for our annual Open House and Galley Giveaway. </p><p>Things that will greet you upon your arrival:</p><ul><li>FREE galleys! Help us clear out our storage closets by taking home all the prepublication and advance copies of books that you can carry. The Galley Giveaway begins the night of our Open House and continues until supplies run out. You will find a mix of books that includes both fiction and nonfiction, picture books, easy readers, early chapter books, middle grade, and young adult books.</li></ul><ul><li>Apple cider and doughnuts from Curtis Orchard!</li></ul><p>This is a chance to converse with CCB staff and youth services faculty and to learn about the range of GSLIS-sponsored activities and programs for students, faculty, librarians, teachers, researchers, and community members who share an interest in literature and media for children and young adults. There will be a short presentation before the Galley Giveaway at approximately 5:15 p.m. that will introduce you to the various units that comprise Room 24 including:</p><ul><li>The Center for Children's Books</li><li><em>The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books</em></li><li>CCB Outreach and Communications</li></ul><p>Contact the <a href="mailto:">"Center for Children's Books"-ccb, at illinois.edu-</a> with questions or call (217) 244-9331</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 24 LIS Building, Center for Children&#039;s Books </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Wed, 09/17/2014 - <span class="date-display-start">5:00pm</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">7:00pm</span></span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/09/17/center-childrens-books-annual-open-house-galley-giveaway#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:21:10 +0000 mclaugh 9336 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Lenstra to present oral history work at MAC Symposium http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/lenstra-present-oral-history-work-mac-symposium <p>GSLIS doctoral student Noah Lenstra will serve on the concluding panel at the Midwest Archives Conference (MAC) Fall Symposium, which will take place September 12 and 13 at the Illini Union. The theme of the symposium is “Oral History, Archives, and Innovation.”</p><p>Lenstra will present his work as the project director of <a href="http://eblackcu.net/portal/" target="_blank">eBlack Champaign-Urbana</a>, a collaborative program focused on creating a digital library of historical and cultural material, blogs, videos, and other media of the African-American community in Champaign-Urbana. For two years, Lenstra guided local high school students in implementing oral history projects with local African-American senior citizens. These projects involved partnerships with local businesses, community groups, churches, and community centers. The eBlackCU project worked with local archives, libraries, and museums to aggregate these oral histories into a single website.</p><p>Lenstra will focus his MAC comments on these projects, with a particular focus on what it means to develop, implement, and preserve community-based oral history projects in the digital age.</p><p>“The audience of 150 archivists from across the Midwest will, I hope, leave the panel with an enriched understanding of the work involved in this type of project, the benefits of moving their archives in this direction, and the collaborations required to bring this type of work to fruition,” says Lenstra.</p><p>Joining Lenstra in the panel discussion, titled "Local Oral History Projects Showcase," will be GSLIS alumni Joanne Kaczmarek (MS '00) and Ellen Swain (MS '95). The symposium itself will examine best practices to collect, curate, and disseminate oral histories in a digital age and how technologies and tools can be used to capture and preserve history. The program and link to registration is available on the <a href="http://www.midwestarchives.org/2014-fall-symposium" target="_blank">MAC website</a>.</p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/lenstra-present-oral-history-work-mac-symposium#comments Archives and Preservation Social and Community Informatics student news Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:27:06 +0000 cashwill 9333 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu LEEP Co-hort 19.5 http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2015/01/08/leep-co-hort-195 <p>More information to follow.</p><div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-start">Thu, 01/08/2015</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">Wed, 01/14/2015</span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2015/01/08/leep-co-hort-195#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 14:29:12 +0000 mclaugh 9332 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu History Salon: Alan Bilansky http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/10/14/history-salon-alan-bilansky <p>Please join us for a discussion of the information practices of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, presented by GSLIS student Alan Bilansky. More information to follow.</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 109 LIS Building </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Tue, 10/14/2014 - <span class="date-display-start">12:00pm</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">1:30pm</span></span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/10/14/history-salon-alan-bilansky#comments Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:06:33 +0000 mclaugh 9328 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu I-Link training http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/09/03/i-link-training <p>Details TBA</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> GSLIS Room 126 and virtual </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sponsor"> <div class="field-label">Sponsor:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> GSLIS Career Services </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Wed, 09/03/2014 - <span class="date-display-start">12:00pm</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">1:00pm</span></span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/09/03/i-link-training#comments Student Affairs Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:58:10 +0000 kimsch 9326 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Kickstart Your Career! http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/09/02/kickstart-your-career <p>Details TBA</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> GSLIS Room 126 and virtual </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sponsor"> <div class="field-label">Sponsor:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> GSLIS Career Services </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Tue, 09/02/2014 - <span class="date-display-start">12:00pm</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">1:00pm</span></span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/09/02/kickstart-your-career#comments Student Affairs Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:56:06 +0000 kimsch 9325 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu McDowell leads Student Affairs team http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/mcdowell-leads-student-affairs-team <p>Kate McDowell (MS ’99, PhD ’07), GSLIS associate professor, has been appointed assistant dean for the Office of Student Affairs as of August 16, 2014. McDowell has been serving as interim assistant dean since January and will continue to oversee admissions, advising, career services, and recruiting while managing Student Affairs as it expands its services and renews its focus on student engagement. </p> <p>“Our mission is to foster a learning experience that enables students to reach their individual goals in a balanced, healthy, inclusive student environment,” said McDowell. “We support a full roster of advising and career events (<a href="http://www.lis.illinois.edu/newsroom/events" target="_blank">available on the GSLIS calendar</a>) as well as ongoing individual student consultations. This semester, we’ll have a survey and several open meetings in late October to gather feedback on Student Affairs work.”</p> <p>Students Affairs will also be organizing Lightning Talks on Saturday, October 11, during which students make quick presentations about their current projects. This will be just one of many activities planned for LEEP weekend. Staff will also be working on a new event called Course-apalooza in late October. </p><p>“Course-apalooza will let both on-campus and online students connect with instructors and allow instructors to promote their exciting spring course offerings," said McDowell. "The format will be a combination of short talks and info tables.”</p> <p>“I’m delighted that Kate has accepted this position. Kate has been here at GSLIS in one role or another for over 15 years; she has rich and discerning understanding of all aspects of the School, and has always been deeply committed to understanding and improving the student experience,” said GSLIS Dean and Professor Allen Renear.</p> <p>McDowell has been a member of the GSLIS faculty since 2007. She teaches and conducts research in youth services librarianship, the history of readers, and storytelling and has published articles in <em>Children and Libraries, Book History,</em> <em>Libraries and the Cultural Record, </em>and <em>Library Quarterly</em>. </p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/mcdowell-leads-student-affairs-team#comments School News student news Thu, 21 Aug 2014 22:33:08 +0000 kimsch 9323 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Diesner, Mishra present at ACM Web Science Conference http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/diesner-mishra-present-acm-web-science-conference <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="/sites/default/files/imagecache/resize-300w/Diesner_and_Mishra.jpeg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-resize-300w imagecache-default imagecache-resize-300w_default" width="300" height="225" /> </div> </div> </div> <p>Assistant Professor Jana Diesner and GSLIS doctoral student Shubhanshu Mishra recently attended the ACM Web Science 2014 conference held in Bloomington, Indiana. They presented their paper, “Comparison of communication networks built from explicit and implicit data,” co-authored with Illinois engineering master’s student Amirhossein Aleyasen, as well as PhD candidate Aaron Schecter and Professor Noshir Contractor, both of Northwestern University. </p> <blockquote><p>Abstract: Social networks can be constructed from explicit information about who is talking to whom, and/ or inferred from the content of communication. How do the resulting network structures compare? We provided an answer to this question by constructing explicit social networks from chat logs and comparing them to implicit social networks built from text data generated by these agents. We apply different conceptualizations of similarity to the text data. This work helps to understand if explicit social networks (what people typically work with) can serve as a proxy for the true structure of communication networks. Our findings suggest that the more simplistic approach on the lexical level outperforms the more complex, topic-based approach. This means that reconstructing social networks based on lexical features is the best option tested, while detecting alternative and additional latent structures of people sharing the same topical knowledge requires looking for thematic clusters of word use.  </p></blockquote><p>They also presented a poster at the conference, <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49960">“Enthusiasm and support: alternative sentiment classification for social movements on social media”</a> co-authored with bioinformatics master’s student Sneha Agarwal, GSLIS doctoral students Jinlong Guo and Kirstin Phelps, and Johna Picco (MS ’14). By analyzing social media, specifically Twitter, they found that enthusiastic and supportive tweets are more prevalent in tweets about social causes than other types of tweets on Twitter. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTRn9vCVpT8#t=2250">Mishra participated in a PechaKucha event at the conference, presenting a lighting talk about this work.</a> </p> <p>“The conference not only involved the computational aspects of the field of web science, but also the need for greater interdisciplinary involvement of researchers from other fields,” said Mishra, who received the ACM SigWeb Student Travel award to attend the conference. “The presentations and sessions were a great blend of getting to know the social aspect of the information and research on the web along with introduction to new theories and solutions that can help in the advancement of web science research.” </p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/diesner-mishra-present-acm-web-science-conference#comments network analysis Online Communities socio-technical data analytics web science Fri, 15 Aug 2014 18:25:47 +0000 kimsch 9320 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Get to know Jennifer Borchardt (MS '11), customer experience VP http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/get-know-jennifer-borchardt-ms-11-customer-experience-vp <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="/sites/default/files/imagecache/resize-300w/_IGP1775.jpg.jpeg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-resize-300w imagecache-default imagecache-resize-300w_default" width="300" height="305" /> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jennifer Borchardt built on a strong background in user experience design and strategy with a master’s degree from GSLIS. Now Borchardt is a VP at a major bank and speaks professionally to peer groups and graduate students.</p><p><strong>Where do you work and what is your role?</strong><br />I am a group lead and vice president in the online customer experience team at Wells Fargo, one of the largest banks in the United States. My team designs Wells Fargo's customer-facing web sites and applications for mobile and tablet devices. My work is an exciting intersection of creative, technical, and business. My professional background is in user experience design and strategy. I have worked at Wells Fargo for nine years and have been in this field for almost eighteen years. I am based in San Francisco, but frequently travel around the U.S. for work. I was previously a lead for an international trading firm; I lived and worked throughout Europe for six years and managed creative and technical teams in fourteen countries.</p><p><strong>What do you like best about your job?</strong><br />The number one reason why I love coming to work each day is the people with whom I work. I have an exceptionally talented team and outstanding leaders who consistently challenge me. Working in a large financial institution isn't for everyone, but it's perfect for me. I really enjoy the structure and order of everything as well as the regulations and challenges of working within them. I also get to specialize and become an expert in a growing field. I am very passionate about what I do: help people make better financial decisions. I feel incredibly fortunate to be doing this work and to be able to go all of the places in the world this work has taken me.</p><p><strong>How did GSLIS help you get to where you are today?</strong><br />Illinois’s library and information science program is widely respected, so being a graduate has definitely opened a lot of doors for me personally and professionally. Immediately upon completing my graduate studies, I was offered a much larger strategic leadership role at Wells Fargo. Soon afterwards, I was invited to work with some leading graduate programs, including MIT and Stanford. My Illinois connection also gave me the opportunity to get speaking engagements with several respected technology companies and professional organizations.</p><p>The business and computer science courses I took at GSLIS were hugely valuable. The courses that were most beneficial and directly applicable to my career were Yoo-Seong Song's Information Consulting and Catherine Blake's Introduction to Databases. They were among the most challenging classes I have ever taken and gave me extremely valuable technical and professional skills. Studying at GSLIS was a great opportunity for me because it allowed me to continue working and stay current in a rapidly advancing field while getting a top-notch graduate education. I was able to immediately apply my professional experience to my studies and vice versa, which helped both tremendously.</p><p><strong>What advice would you like to share with GSLIS students?</strong><br />Be creative; creative in how you approach your GSLIS education and how you apply what you've learned to your professional pursuits. Library and information science is one of the most versatile areas of study. The skills learned in this program can be applied to a variety of fields—business, education, technology, finance, and science to name just a few. The only limitation is how you decide to use these skills and market yourself to potential employers.</p><p>Networking is also hugely important. Develop productive relationships with your professors and fellow students; if you're in the LEEP program, many of these students are already accomplished professionals so take extra care to connect with them, particularly if they are working in a field that interests you. If you have a class project that enables you to work with an outside company, it's well worth the effort to cultivate a relationship with the company's representative. Professors can often help with that. Also, don't forget to reach out to the Illinois alumni network. Informational interviews and emails can sometimes lead to a great job, given enough time and the right kind of effort.</p><p>In short, don't be shy about creatively (yet honestly) marketing yourself as having the valuable skills you're learning in GSLIS!</p><p><strong>What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?</strong><br />I am fortunate to have a job that gives me a lot of vacation time, so I travel around the world for scuba diving and cycling trips. The San Francisco Bay Area is one of the best places anywhere for cycling so I do a lot of riding here, too. I participate in about a dozen races and long-distance cycling events per year, including an annual ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles to raise money for the San Francisco AIDS Foundation. I also spend a lot of time working on my house and, like many GSLIS students, doting on my cats.</p><p><strong>What’s next for you?</strong><br />Professionally, I am evolving the user experience practice at Wells Fargo and growing my team of talented designers and user experience experts. I am also doing more professional speaking events and guest lecturing at graduate programs. I would love to be a guest speaker in a GSLIS class. Personally, I want to continue traveling and am planning to visit five new countries this year. Someday in the not too distant future, I would love to apply what I learned in GSLIS to help build libraries and learning centers in a developing country.</p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/get-know-jennifer-borchardt-ms-11-customer-experience-vp#comments alumni news alumni profile Get to know GSLIS Fri, 15 Aug 2014 13:54:38 +0000 cglaze 9248 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Knox’s intellectual freedom research gains national momentum http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/knox%E2%80%99s-intellectual-freedom-research-gains-national-momentum <p>With a book under contract, a nationwide research project underway, a recent publication in <em>The Library Quarterly</em>, and plans to teach a unique new course to students across the country this fall, Assistant Professor Emily Knox (MS ’03) is gaining national attention for her research in the area of intellectual freedom. </p><p>First inspired to study banned books by her mother, a former high school librarian, Knox’s research today centers around the relationships between information, society, and power, and the impact of these relationships on intellectual freedom. She’s found her niche looking specifically at what factors motivate individuals to initiate book challenges.</p> <p>“I look at the themes in challengers’ discourse and try to understand the commonalities,” Knox explained. “How do they justify this thing that seems so strange to many of us and goes against a lot of ideas about ‘freedom’ in the United States?”</p> <p>Though there has been much documentation and publicity surrounding attempts to restrict access to print and electronic information, most focuses on the responses of librarians and communities rather than the factors that motivate some individuals to request that access to particular information be restricted. Knox is under contract with Rowman and Littlefield to publish a book in 2015 in which she’ll examine the worldviews that motivate challengers as well as their own reading habits.</p> <p>To explore this issue quantitatively, Knox and colleagues from the University of Kentucky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and MuckRock, an outlet for government document-based news and public records request clearinghouse, created the <a href="http://mappinginfoaccess.org/" target="_blank">Mapping Information Access</a> project. This initiative seeks to compile data on book challenges and internet filtering from the public records of every public library and school in the nation. Although starting with a sample of institutions across the country, the team hopes to eventually create a comprehensive record of challenges and shed light on the conditions in which information access has been challenged or restricted. They are collecting geographic, demographic, and economic data, as well as collection development policies and internet filtering protocols. </p><p>“Almost all of the books that you read on intellectual freedom say that books can be banned anywhere, but there’s no citation for that. We have really incomplete information. This research will give us a bird’s eye view of how challenging operates over the entire country,” Knox explained. “I’m interested in seeing if there are general trends with book banning. I’m particularly interested in correlations between challenges and economic downturns or insider/outsider effects.”</p> <p>Knox has also investigated the historical evolution of book banning and the implications of this in modern librarianship. In January, she published an article titled, “Supporting Intellectual Freedom: Symbolic Capital and Practical Philosophy in Librarianship,” in <em>The Library Quarterly,</em> 84(1). In this paper, Knox discussed how three areas—codification, institutionalization, and investigation—formed the foundation of a practical philosophy for the support of intellectual freedom in librarianship.</p> <p>Knox’s research into the history of intellectual freedom and contemporary censorship activities are coming together in a new course she will teach this fall. Offered jointly by GSLIS and the Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF), the graduate-level course will be taught online and will be open to any student enrolled in a library and information science program.</p> <p>“We will explore a range of topics in the class from the historical roots of intellectual freedom to pro- and anti-censorship arguments, as well as learn practical strategies for supporting intellectual freedom in libraries and other institutional settings,” Knox said.</p> <p>“We’re thrilled to enter into this partnership with the University of Illinois,” said FTRF Executive Director Barbara M. Jones. “We’re particularly looking forward to working with Emily Knox, who has quickly established herself as a leading expert in the field.”</p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/knox%E2%80%99s-intellectual-freedom-research-gains-national-momentum#comments intellectual freedom Librarianship Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:42:05 +0000 kimsch 9318 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Putting documentary films in ConText http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/putting-documentary-films-context <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="/sites/default/files/imagecache/resize-300w/Cover%20shot%20ConText_0.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-resize-300w imagecache-default imagecache-resize-300w_default" width="300" height="450" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img src="/sites/default/files/imagecache/resize-300w/Context%20Word%20Image_0.png" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-resize-300w imagecache-default imagecache-resize-300w_default" width="300" height="259" /> </div> </div> </div> <p>Documentary films are powerful storytelling vehicles. The best social justice films take us to places we’ve not been before, engaging our minds and our hearts as they explore some of the most significant issues of society: poverty, education, the environment, health, social equality. In ninety minutes or less, we are moved by these stories. But are we moved to action? </p><p>That is the question that Jana Diesner, assistant professor, set out to answer. “A great number of documentary films are made with the idea that by bringing an issue to the public in an artistically appealing, compelling, and dramatic way, they can have an impact by effecting change,” she said. “Often that means an incremental contribution towards some bigger goal.”</p> <p>However, it has been diffcult to tell whether watching a movie on climate change, for example, actually moves people to alter their perception or habits. In fact, the success of a social justice documentary is often measured either by quantitative metrics such as the number of screenings, or in a more qualitative fashion by conducting interviews with small focus groups before and after a screening.</p> <p>Diesner took a different approach that brings these solutions closer together. She wanted to find out how people thought and felt about an issue before and after a movie was released, and to identify how much the film’s content and its coverage in both traditional and social media contribute towards any change in the public discourse. She knew that by combining methods from natural language processing, social network analysis, and data visualization, she could get a more comprehensive, rigorous, and effcient grasp on the impact of a documentary.</p> <p>With support from the JustFilms division of the Ford Foundation—a major funder of documentary films—Diesner put together a team of graduate students from a diverse set of backgrounds to design and build ConText, a publicly available tool that facilitates impact assessment. In addition to evaluating impact after a film has been released, they also bring this computational solution to filmmakers in earlier stages of work. Using ConText, Diesner and her team work in collaboration with various directors, producers, and funders to identify strategic opportunities that make the most of outreach and campaigning, ultimately increasing the impact of films that are about to be released.</p> <p>This collaboration doesn’t only make the film’s impact more powerful, it also makes ConText work even better. “We gain a tremendous amount of valuable insights from working directly with filmmakers and those in the media. Their subject matter expertise is fundamental to our ability to improve our technology such that it becomes more useful and gets used to solve a specific real-world problem here and now,“ said Diesner. </p> <p><strong></strong><em><strong>Photo caption:</strong> Team members include, from left Andrew Higgins, doctoral student in philosophy; Shubhanshu Mishra, doctoral student in GSLIS; Sean Wilner, doctoral student in Informatics; Diesner; Kiumars Soltani, doctoral student in Informatics; Jinseok Kim, doctoral student in GSLIS; Liang Tao, master's student in agricultural engineering; and Amirhossein Aleyasen, master's student in computer science.</em></p><p> <strong>Putting ConText to work</strong></p><p><strong></strong>After realizing she could apply a computational method to a seemingly abstract question, Diesner and her team had to decide what indicators they would use to measure impact. They then got to work identifying and developing methods and software that enable the measuring and analysis of these indicators.</p> <p>It isn’t only important, though, to find the right opportunities for connection. Diesner found that filmmakers must also be strategic in the way in which they communicate with journalists if they want to increase a film’s impact. “In our analyses we sometimes see a strong focus in the press on portraying a film as a high-quality art product, which is certainly a major goal and success for a filmmaker. However, if they more strongly present their film as a vehicle for raising public awareness around an issue when talking to reporters, the focus turns to the issue, not the art. We have observed this trend for classic media as well as social media. On social media, interestingly, it is often the user community who ties the art product to a lively debate on a broad range of aspects of the issue,” said Diesner.</p> <p><strong>The House I Live In</strong></p> <p>One documentary that aimed to increase awareness and education concerning an issue is the award-winning film, <em>The House I Live In</em>. Written and directed by renowned filmmaker Eugene Jarecki, the documentary investigates drug use in America, acknowledging the devastating effects drug use has on families while also challenging the notion that the war on drugs, as it has played out in the political arena as well as the criminal justice system for the last forty years, is having any positive effect. In fact, the movie asserts that it is the war on drugs and mandatory minimum sentencing that has made “America the world’s largest jailer, and destroyed impoverished communities at home and abroad, all while drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever.”</p> <p>In their baseline model, Diesner’s team discovered that the issues of mandatory minimum sentencing and prisons were jointly discussed with other topics, mainly drugs and legislation. Diesner asserts that facilitating discussion of these topics when talking about the documentary could increase the film’s chances of making an impact. Following the movie’s release, Diesner found that <em>The House I Live In</em> was covered by the press both as an art product as well as a vehicle for discussion around the war on drugs and the social issues that surround the topic. Early social media posts mainly related to screening announcements and introducing the movie's director, main characters, and issues. Eventually, the commenters on these posts not only tied the film to the issues at hand, but also included themes not addressed in the original posts, such as the workings of the prison system, the experiences of people of color, and how drugs have affected people’s lives. The film’s social media accounts continued the dialogue, and ultimately it is this engagement that has kept the issue—and the movie—in active discussion.</p> <p>The movie was released in 2012 and, among its many honors, received the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Two years later, the front page of the film’s website is devoted to educating readers and providing ways to act on the issue. Similarly, the documentary’s Facebook page remains active, notifying its nearly 20,000 fans about legislative developments as well as coverage of the drug war in the media.</p> <p><strong>Beyond the screen</strong></p> <p>ConText was developed to further investigate social justice documentaries, but the tool functions across a wide set of uses and users. From the very beginning, Diesner built ConText with a bigger goal in mind: to create a tool that conducted text analysis and network analysis in an integrated and efficient fashion, and to make this tool available across disciplines.</p> <p>Diesner and her team are currently expanding the reach of ConText by branching out into the assessment of other types of media, such as feature stories and campaigns. “We have begun to think about impact assessment in a more generalized way as it also applies to other domains, including academia, politics, and business. We also continue to develop, apply, and evaluate methods and algorithms for constructing different types of network data based on natural language text data and jointly analyzing text data and network data. ConText is our sandbox for providing these novel solutions.“</p> <p>In order to bring ConText to the end user, Diesner and her team are continuously running hands-on training workshops to participants from academia, the private sector, and governmental units. Diesner has conducted training workshops for this open-source tool with scholars in South Korea, Denmark, South Africa, Peru, Russia, and the U.S. “Seeing how people interact with the tool helps us to continuously improve the usability and routines offered in ConText. Users come to us with projects in mind and suggestions for new features that we might never think of, and we greatly appreciate that feedback.”</p><p><em><strong>Note regarding image:</strong> Topics present in the dataset containing press releases about the documentary </em>The House I Live In<em> after the documentary was released. Each cloud represents a topic comprised of several words. The words in the cloud have been tagged according to the sentiment related to them. The topic positioning represents how closely the text represents the topic. The center cloud represents a more central topics in the text which in this case is gun, assault, county and judge. Other topics around the center in clockwise direction are in decreasing order of their fit to the overall text. The font size of each word represents the frequency of that word relative to other words.</em></p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/putting-documentary-films-context#comments Social and Community Informatics socio-technical data analytics Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:09:24 +0000 kimsch 9316 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu GSLIS Convocation http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2015/05/17/gslis-convocation <p>More information to follow.</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Smith Memorial Hall </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Sun, 05/17/2015 - 9:30am</span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2015/05/17/gslis-convocation#comments Wed, 13 Aug 2014 15:48:53 +0000 mclaugh 9314 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu GSLIS students named ARL 2014-2016 Diversity Scholars http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/gslis-students-named-arl-2014-2016-diversity-scholars <div class="field field-type-text field-field-byline"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> press release courtesy of The Association of Research Libraries </div> </div> </div> <p>Members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Committee on Diversity and Leadership have selected thirteen LIS master's students to participate in the<a href="http://www.arl.org/news/arl-news/3355-arl-diversity-scholars-selected-for-2014-2016#.U-ktT2Nmh8E" target="_blank"> 2014–2016 Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) as ARL Diversity Scholars</a>.</p><p>Underwritten by ARL member libraries, the Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce offers numerous financial benefits to program participants as well as leadership development provided through the annual ARL Leadership Symposium, a formal mentoring program, career placement assistance, and an ARL research library visit. This program reflects the commitment of ARL members to create a diverse research library professional community that will better meet the challenges of changing demographics in higher education and the emphasis on global perspectives in the academy.</p><p>Jay Schafer, director of libraries at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and member of the IRDW selection committee, said, “It is always inspiring to review the IRDW applications and to learn there are so many highly qualified students from traditionally underrepresented groups who are excited about careers in academic and research libraries, and archives. My only regret is that we cannot provide support to a greater number of these students.”</p><p>Fellow selection committee member Alberta Comer, dean of the J. Willard Marriott Library and university librarian at the University of Utah, added, “The IRDW is helping libraries build a more diverse workforce, a critical component for providing the services and resources needed by students and faculty in the twenty-first century. Diversity in library staff and in library leadership is needed now more than ever as our communities become more enriched with racial and ethnic diversity.”</p><p>The 2014–2016 Diversity Scholars are:</p><ul><li><strong>    Alonso Avila, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign</strong></li><li>    Benjamin D. Branch, North Carolina Central University</li><li>    Richard Cho, University of California, Los Angeles</li><li>    Linh Gavin Do, Indiana University Bloomington</li><li>    Joyce Gabiola, Simmons College</li><li>    Alia Gant, University of Texas at Austin</li><li>    John Martin, University of North Texas</li><li>    Alda Migoni, University of California, Los Angeles</li><li>    Amanda Moreno, Long Island University/New York University</li><li>    Rebecca Orozco, St. Catherine University</li><li>    Monique Perez, University of Arizona</li><li>  <strong>  Yesenia Román-López, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign</strong></li><li>    Deborah Alvarez Tarver, Florida State University</li></ul><p>The <a href="http://www.arl.org/" target="_blank">Association of Research Libraries (ARL)</a> is a nonprofit organization of 125 libraries in the US and Canada. ARL’s mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, facilitating the emergence of new roles for research libraries, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations.</p> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/articles/2014/08/gslis-students-named-arl-2014-2016-diversity-scholars#comments honors and awards student news Mon, 11 Aug 2014 21:58:38 +0000 cglaze 9300 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Meet Blackboard Collaborate http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/08/27/meet-blackboard-collaborate <p>Ready to LEEP into fall but need some help with Blackboard Collaborate?</p><p>Join GSLIS ITD for our Meet Blackboard Collaborate workshops. These workshops will assist you with logging into your Blackboard Collaborate live sessions as well as introduce you to the main tools and functions of the online environment. All of these workshops will be in the Blackboard Collaborate Main Meeting Room; you can access this room by copying and pasting this link into your preferred browser: <a href="http://go.illinois.edu/gslis_meeting">http://go.illinois.edu/gslis_meeting</a>.</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> VIRTUAL </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Wed, 08/27/2014 - 12:00pm</span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/08/27/meet-blackboard-collaborate#comments Mon, 11 Aug 2014 16:57:23 +0000 mclaugh 9297 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu Meet Blackboard Collaborate http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/08/26/meet-blackboard-collaborate <p>Ready to LEEP into fall but need some help with Blackboard Collaborate?</p><p>Join GSLIS ITD for our Meet Blackboard Collaborate workshops. These workshops will assist you with logging into your Blackboard Collaborate live sessions as well as introduce you to the main tools and functions of the online environment. All of these workshops will be in the Blackboard Collaborate Main Meeting Room; you can access this room by copying and pasting this link into your preferred browser: <a href="http://go.illinois.edu/gslis_meeting">http://go.illinois.edu/gslis_meeting</a>.</p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-location"> <div class="field-label">Location:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> VIRTUAL </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-eventdate"> <div class="field-label">Event Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Tue, 08/26/2014 - 12:00pm</span> </div> </div> </div> http://www.lis.illinois.edu/events/2014/08/26/meet-blackboard-collaborate#comments Mon, 11 Aug 2014 16:56:48 +0000 mclaugh 9296 at http://www.lis.illinois.edu